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July

2018
  • Local company, ASU students create cool solution for lake lovers

    Local company, ASU students create cool solution for lake lovers

    Through the Fulton Schools eProjects program that partners students with industry to work on real-world technology solutions, students at the Polytechnic School and a misting systems company found a way to keep boating enthusiasts comfortable during hot summers days. They developed a a solar energy-powered mechanism that draws water from lakes or other waterways, then purifies the water before spraying it in tiny droplets into the boat, keeping the occupants cool.

  • ASU, Embry-Riddle students build pod for Elon Musk’s SpaceX Hyperloop competition

    ASU, Embry-Riddle students build pod for Elon Musk’s SpaceX Hyperloop competition

    The hopes of more than 60 ASU and Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University students are riding on a 10-foot-long, self-propelled, high-speed transport pod they have designed and built for an international competition sponsored by tech guru Elon Musk’s SpaceX company. Graduate and undergraduate students majoring in engineering, business, graphic design and other disciplines combined their skills for the AZLoop project.

    See also: ASU to showcase Hyperloop pod at international SpaceX competition, 3TV/CBS 5 News, July 13

    Composites One helps Arizona State Hyperloop team prepare for SpaceX competition, Composites Manufacturing, July 9

  • Make the robot dance and the chips fly

    Make the robot dance and the chips fly

    Four recent Fulton Schools graduates impressed engineers at Raytheon, the major defense industry company, with their solution for repairing a massive robotic arm used in the company’s manufacturing operations. Recent graduates Rebecca Bell (robotics), Jesse Wittkowski (robotics and manufacturing), Aaron Dolgin (electrical engineering) and Riley Chicci (robotics) teamed up to fix the 13,000-pound robotic arm at the Innovation Hub on ASU’s Polytechnic campus.

  • Company making smart pool gate locks

    Company making smart pool gate locks

    The many children who are victims of drowning or near-drowning in home swimming pools each year motivated Fulton Schools software engineering student Kevin Hale and a business partner to develop the Halen Smart Lock. Their device designed to be placed on a pool gate contains a sensor that will send an alert to a phone when the gate has been opened or closed. The device enables users to deadbolt the gate so it cannot be opened. The venture has been supported by the Ashton Family Venture Challenge, which is part of ASU’s Startup Funding Network.

  • The right mix of gut microbes relieves autism symptoms in the long run

    The right mix of gut microbes relieves autism symptoms in the long run

    One way to improve the health of children with autism might be to alter the makeup of the mix of bacteria and other microbes that live in human intestines. Research by Fulton Schools Associate Professor Rosa Krajmalnik-Brown and colleagues at the ASU Biodesign Institute’s Swette Center for Environmental Biotechnology indicates that introducing a more diverse mix into what’s called the gut microbiome helps alleviate digestive issues and behavioral symptoms associated with autism. Krajmalnik-Brown reported on a two-year study on the treatment at a recent Beneficial Microbes Conference.

  • How has hacking evolved, and how much is consumer data worth?

    How has hacking evolved, and how much is consumer data worth?

    Computer system hacking has grown increasingly complex, making cybersecurity an ever-evolving challenge, says Fulton Schools Assistant Professor Adam Doupé, who is associate director of ASU’s Center for Cybersecurity and Digital Forensics. With more and more valuable information online, Doupé warns that the financial incentives for cyber attacks are getting bigger and massive hacking can do more damage than ever.

    See also: Arizona professor explains how hacking evolved to data theft, Claims Journal, July 13

  • Solar technology seeking a balance

    Solar technology seeking a balance

    Work that is contributing to the evolutionary advance toward reliable and affordable solar energy systems and technologies is being led at ASU by Fulton Schools Professor Christiana Honsberg in the Quantum Energy and Sustainable Solar Technologies research center and by Fulton Schools Professor Vijay Vittal at the Power Systems Engineering Research Center and Assistant Professor Nathan Johnson at the Laboratory for Energy and Power Solutions.  

  • AZLoop a high-speed gateway to space for ASU mechanical engineer

    AZLoop a high-speed gateway to space for ASU mechanical engineer

    Fulton Schools mechanical and electrical engineering students are among leaders of the AZLoop team competing in the international Hyperloop challenge to design and build a prototype high-speed transportation system. Started by prominent SpaceX founder Elon Musk, the competition is bringing 18 teams of college students to California this month to vie for a place in the Hyperloop’s final round.

    See also: Students from ASU, Embry-Riddle enter SpaceX competition, AZCentral.com, July 10

    ASU students unveil pod in second try at SpaceX Hyperloop challenge, Phoenix Business Journal, July 10

     

  • Scottsdale tech firm pledges $1M to help 100 women pursue STEM careers

    Scottsdale tech firm pledges $1M to help 100 women pursue STEM careers

    Ashley Bruner, a recent graduate of Xavier College Preparatory high school in Phoenix, is the first recipient of vCore Technology Partners’ “Women in Technology” scholarship. She will use the scholarship to support studies in the Fulton Schools’ computer systems engineering program in the fall. Within that field, Bruner plans to focus on information assurance. See related information at vCORE Women in Technology Scholarship.

    See also: Ashley Bruner wins inaugural vCore scholarship for women in technology, Scottsdale Independent, July 11

  • Mesa teacher gets national award for STEM teaching

    Mesa teacher gets national award for STEM teaching

    Erik Von Burg, a teacher who for a decade has worked with the Arizona FIRST LEGO League — a robotics and STEM education program for young students managed by the Fulton Schools — was recently awarded the national Presidential Award for Excellence in Mathematics and Science Teaching. The award is bestowed by the White House Office of Science and Technology and the National Science Foundation. Von Burg is a specialist for the Mesa Public Schools’ program for gifted students.

June

2018
  • Academia and Industry Partnerships Go Far Beyond Internships

    Academia and Industry Partnerships Go Far Beyond Internships

    The Fulton Schools are being recognized as an innovator in developing productive partnerships between industry and academia to more comprehensively educate the next generation of engineers. The American Society of Mechanical Engineers reports on the efforts being led by Fulton Schools Dean Kyle Squires to give students opportunities to engage with real-world engineering pursuits early in their college years. Career Center Director Robin Hammond says industry is in turn engaging with students in educational and research endeavors. Some of the most prominent high-tech companies now have collaborative arrangements with the Fulton Schools.

  • How do Arizonans’ online protections compare in wake of California privacy law?

    How do Arizonans’ online protections compare in wake of California privacy law?

    A new California law enables people to see how companies are using individuals’ personal data online. In addition, people can ask for such information to be deleted from online content. The regulatory action could start a trend that brings such privacy protection to Arizona, says Fulton Schools Assistant Professor Adam Doupé, who directs ASU’s Center for Cybersecurity and Digital Forensics. Still, he thinks it will be difficult to completely deter the misuse of personal information that has been online at any time in the past.

  • Students learning about engineering, transportation through ASU

    Students learning about engineering, transportation through ASU

    About 100 Arizona high school students are getting a first-hand look at how engineering impacts everyday life through ASU’s Transportation Engineering Experience summer sessions. There are important lessons to be learned simply by examining all the transportation planning, technology and traffic management it takes to move people from one place to another in a busy urban area, says Professor Tirupalavanam Ganesh, the assistant dean of engineering education for the Fulton Schools, who helps to lead the program. More information at TEE@ASU.

     

  • Extreme heat could mean danger when flying

    Extreme heat could mean danger when flying

    Heat can lead to air travel hazards, says Fulton Schools faculty associate Michael Hampshire. The aviation instructor explains what pilots can do to reduce the risks of problems that extreme temperatures can create for aircraft. Using a flight simulator, he demonstrates some of the measures that can be taken to avoid emergency situations.

  • Tempe company explores 3D printing for NASA spacecraft

    Tempe company explores 3D printing for NASA spacecraft

    Engineers have been looking at structures created by nature for ideas to improve the design and manufacture of new products and technologies. Fulton Schools Associate Professor Dhruv Bhate explores potential nature-inspired technical solutions at ASU’s Biomimicry Center. Now he is using his skills to help a local tech company see if 3D printing can mimic natural structures. If it works, the process could help improve NASA’s fleet by enabling the manufacture of devices and components for spacecraft that are stronger and lighter.

     

  • Lessons learned from U.S. Navy microgrids in Hawaii

    Lessons learned from U.S. Navy microgrids in Hawaii

    Energy industry representatives and military and government leaders who gathered at conference on the Hawaiian island of Oahu got sobering news about continuing challenges hindering efforts to establish more resilient sources of energy on the island. Better news came from Fulton Schools Assistant Professor Nathan Johnson, director of ASU’s Laboratory for Energy And Power Solutions. Johnson described the Microgrid Boot Camp he helps to lead. The program is educating engineers, entrepreneurs and students — many of them military veterans — about working with new microgrid technologies and systems to provide communities with more reliable power.

     

  • A Conversation with Rao Kambhampati

    A Conversation with Rao Kambhampati

    “I wouldn’t be surprised if one day a computer writes a symphony that we enjoy,” says Fulton Schools Professor Subbarao Kambhampati in an extensive discussion about artificial intelligence and how it could shape the future. Kambhampati, whose expertise includes machine learning, says AI will definitely have bigger roles in more aspects of society, and human-machine interaction will become a more common part of our lives with advances in AI technology.

  • If you want to make more money in Arizona, major in engineering or computer science

    If you want to make more money in Arizona, major in engineering or computer science

    A report revealing the earning power of graduates from Arizona’s public universities, ranked by students’ major fields of study, finds that those in engineering and computer science are at the top. The study also found that all college graduates, regardless of their majors, are earning more money than people without college degrees, even when deducting payments for student loans. On average, engineering and computer science graduates are making almost twice as much as graduates in several nontechnical fields.

    See also: Which degrees will get you the most money in Arizona? Arizona Daily Star, June 19

  • How India is carving out a niche for itself in the field of Artificial Intelligence

    How India is carving out a niche for itself in the field of Artificial Intelligence

    High-tech experts, business analysts and government leaders see the potential for India to become a major force in expanding the use of artificial intelligence. Fulton Schools Professor Subbarao Kambhampati, computer scientist and president of the international Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence, says that although other countries are leading in AI advances and applications, India has all the pieces in place to make significant progress in big data, machine learning, automation and other AI-related technologies.

    See also:

    Infra to collect data is the tough part (Professor Kambhampati talks about India’s AI infrastructure challenges), The Economic Times, June 16

     

  • The Alluring Dream of Carbon Capture

    The Alluring Dream of Carbon Capture

    Imagine a massive network of machines scrubbing the Earth’s atmosphere to remove carbon dioxide from the sky. Such a scenario is seen as a possible solution for taking the environmentally threatening greenhouse gas out of the air we breathe. But the idea has been dismissed by some because of the enormous cost of the technique. But Fulton Schools Professor Klaus Lackner, a leader in the new carbon-capture technologies, says the costs are coming down to a point where large-scale carbon dioxide removal can become a viable option.

  • Summer is no vacation for these faculty

    Summer is no vacation for these faculty

    Seven of 11 ASU researchers spending the summer in a Mayo Clinic and ASU Alliance for Health Care residency program are Fulton Schools faculty members. Through their expertise in computer science, electronics, artificial intelligence, medical diagnostic devices, bioengineering and biomarker technology, they’ll work to make progress on solving some of the biggest medical and health care challenges.

  • ASU team uses artificial intelligence to detect wildfires before they become catastrophic

    ASU team uses artificial intelligence to detect wildfires before they become catastrophic

    Fulbright Fellow David Azcona spent the past year working with Fulton Schools Assistant Professor Sharon Hsiao on research focused on educational data mining — delving into multimodal learning analytics in computer science education and the use of artificial intelligence in education. He also used his skills on a project with two ASU master’s degree students to develop computer software that analyzes data from a surveillance drone to detect wildfires. The project took fourth place at the recent U.S. Microsoft Imagine Cup, one of the leading student technology competitions, and will vie for an international grand prize in July.

     

     

  • Bitcoin goes to Wall Street: Cryptocurrency’s newest phase

    Bitcoin goes to Wall Street: Cryptocurrency’s newest phase

    A new online stock trading platform is under development that allows investors to buy and hold bitcoin. Along with the commodity exchanges that now offer investment in bitcoin futures, this signals that once highly mistrusted cryptocurrencies are edging closer to the mainstream in the financial industry. Dragan Boscovic, Fulton Schools research professor and Blockchain Research Lab director, talks about what this means for consumers, for Wall Street and for the economy’s evolution.

    See also:

    Cryptocurrencies to trade alongside precious metals in future, says director or Arizona’s blockchain lab, BTC Manager, June 16

    Bitcoin is a valued investment opportunity according to an Arizona State University professor, Crypto Coin News Journal, June 15

    ASU Blockchain Research Lab professor talks DLT & crypto to Wall Street, Bitcoin Exchange Guide, June 15

    Bitcoin a ‘valued investment opportunity’ says Arizona State University professor, Inside Bitcoins, June 14

  • You think it’s your friend calling, but it’s actually this growing phone scam

    You think it’s your friend calling, but it’s actually this growing phone scam

    A tactic called digital spoofing is making people more vulnerable to devious phone scams. It’s estimated that the overall costs of losses to victims of such scams is in the billions of dollars. Flaws in current telephone systems are enabling digital spoofing to proliferate, says Fulton Schools Assistant Professor Adam Doupe, the associate director of the Center for Cybersecurity and Digital Forensics, whose expertise includes telephony security.

     

  • Should you use city water or bottled water?

    Should you use city water or bottled water?

    There are sound reasons to use tap water over bottled water, explains Fulton Schools Professor Rolf Halden, director of ASU’s Center for Environmental Health Engineering and co-founder of the Johns Hopkins University Center for Water and Health. The reasons include not only economics but also sustainability, resource conservation and ecosystem protection.

     

  • The price of panic: ASU experts ground us in what AI really is and can be

    The price of panic: ASU experts ground us in what AI really is and can be

    In a commentary exploring directions in which artificial intelligence technology might be taken in the future, Subbarao Kambhampati contends speculation that AI presents a threat to human society is overinflated. The Fulton Schools professor of computer science and engineering, and president of the international Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence, points out that it is humans who will control the behavioral responses AI will exhibit. So, the real issue is what decisions people will make in shaping AI.

     

  • At Arizona State University, pixelated aluminum louvers shade residence hall

    At Arizona State University, pixelated aluminum louvers shade residence hall

    The perforated aluminum louvered façade of the Fulton Schools’ new Tooker House student residential complex is lauded equally for its design, aesthetics and functionality. Combined with a sandstone panel façade, insulated metal panels and perforated aluminum screens, the structure achieves a significant reduction in solar heat gain while still providing residents natural daylighting indoors and expansive views of the outdoors. Plus, the design emulates the natural patterns and textures of the Southwest’s desert environment.

  • Computer Science Research Is Lacking In These Key Areas

    Computer Science Research Is Lacking In These Key Areas

    Even with the many tech innovations achieved in computer science in the past few decades, the field still needs to make some significant progress to fulfill growing needs. Fulton Schools Assistant Professor Mohamed Sarwat points to the necessity for advances in computer hardware, new applications and the computing systems to handle them, personal data protection systems and data system support for the internet of things as big challenges computer scientists need to overcome.

  • This Gasoline Is Made of Carbon Sucked From the Air

    This Gasoline Is Made of Carbon Sucked From the Air

    The Canadian company Carbon Engineering is developing a liquid fuel that would be carbon-free — providing gasoline that could help reduce the detrimental impacts of climate change by not adding additional carbon dioxide to the atmosphere. Fulton Schools Professor Klaus Lackner has pioneered the concept of capturing carbon dioxide from the air, a process that would be employed by the company to make the new kind of fuel. Lackner says Carbon Engineering is proving the process can work and could also become cost-effective.

    See also:

    Sucking carbon dioxide from air is cheaper than scientists thought, Nature, June 7

    Carbon dioxide extraction moves toward commercialisation, Greener Ideal, June 10

    The potential pitfalls of sucking carbon from the atmosphere, Wired, June 13

  • ASU’s Tillman Scholars poised to tackle society’s toughest problems

    ASU’s Tillman Scholars poised to tackle society’s toughest problems

    Fulton Schools computer science doctoral student Vivin Paliath, an Arizona Army National Guard veteran, is one of two ASU graduate students to be named Tillman Scholars for the Class of 2018. He joins U.S. Air Force veteran Lindsay Lorson, a master’s student in ASU’s Mary Lou Fulton Teachers College, among only 60 recipients across the nation of this year’s Tillman scholarship awards. Pat Tillman was an ASU football star who later left the Arizona Cardinals NFL team to join the U.S. Army. He was killed while on duty in Afghanistan in 2004.

  • ASU to Study Water Savings at City of Phoenix Parks Thanks to Innovative Conservation Program Award

    ASU to Study Water Savings at City of Phoenix Parks Thanks to Innovative Conservation Program Award

    ASU Researchers will be looking at using composted “green waste” materials to replace traditional fertilizer for maintaining grass in public parks in Phoenix. An initial study indicates the compost could boost the water-retaining capacity of soils. If it works, the change could help conserve water, reduce parks maintenance costs and become an operational model program for other cities. Enrique Vivoni, a professor in the Fulton Schools and the School of Earth and Space Exploration, is leading the research team. Vivoni is a hydrologist whose work focuses on interactions between climate, ecosystems and landscapes.

  • 40 Under 40

    40 Under 40

    From more than 300 nominations, Phoenix Magazine selected 40 greater Phoenix area residents 40 years old or younger for demonstrating “brilliant or precocious accomplishment in their field.” Among them is Fulton Schools Assistant Professor Erin Walker. She is developing educational technology to customize instruction for students with different needs. Walker is also using robots to improve teaching of middle school math and boost students’ confidence in their math skills and she has helped to create an app to enhance students’ reading comprehension.

May

2018
  • Tempe uses wastewater to help fight drug abuse

    Tempe uses wastewater to help fight drug abuse

    Tempe is one of the first cities to employ advanced wastewater analysis to help combat drug abuse — particularly opioid abuse. The project uses resources in the Environmental Health Engineering Lab directed by Fulton Schools Professor Rolf Halden. The lab can test wastewater samples to estimate the number people using drugs in a specific area, the quantities of drugs consumed and the potential number of overdose incidents. Halden’s lab team includes Postdoctoral Research Associate Adam Gushgari, a recent graduate of the Fulton Schools Civil, Environmental and Sustainable Engineering doctoral program, and two current doctoral students in the program, Ana Barrios and Erin Driver. Gushgari explained the research to Channel 12 News. Barrios, Driver and Halden did the same for the other news reports listed below.

    See also:

    Buscan en drenajes solución al problema de opioides (They are looking in drains for a solution to the problem of opioids), TeleMundo Arizona, May 30

    ASU scientists turn to wastewater to determine drug presence in the city, The State Press, May 31

    Can sewage provide clues on how to combat opioid crisis? The Fix, June 5

    ASU, Tempe study wastewater for opioid content, Easy Valley Tribune, June 7

  • Triclosan, A Chemical Found In Hand Sanitizers And Cookware, Linked To Gut Problems In New Mouse Study

    Triclosan, A Chemical Found In Hand Sanitizers And Cookware, Linked To Gut Problems In New Mouse Study

    Because it kills bacteria, the chemical compound triclosan has been a popular additive for use in a large number of consumer products, including hand sanitizers, toothpastes, cookware, clothes and furniture. But studies found it can have adverse impacts on human health, particularly causing gut problems. Fulton Schools Professor and director of the Center for Environmental Health Engineering Rolf Halden, whose research helped to raise awareness of the risks related to triclosan, says further studies are strengthening the case for caution in the use of the potentially harmful antimicrobial.

  • Words on water: Dr. Bruce Rittmann on Microbial Communities

    Words on water: Dr. Bruce Rittmann on Microbial Communities

    In a podcast produced by the international Water Environment Federation, Fulton Schools Professor Bruce Rittmann talks about how he and his team at the Swette Center Environmental Biotechnology are using communities of microbes in processes that can convert water pollutants into valuable resources. Rittmann also describes work that is advancing an array of water treatment technologies and improving the engineering and management of water systems.

  • Tempe, ASU to work together in wastewater monitoring to improve public health

    Tempe, ASU to work together in wastewater monitoring to improve public health

    The Center for Environmental Health Engineering directed by Fulton Schools Professor Rolf Halden will work the city of Tempe to monitor the local wastewater system for the presence of health-threatening substances. Halden’s lab will analyze sewage samples to provide real-time data on the presence of opioids and other addictive substances. The partnership is aimed at providing the city information that can guide its efforts to mount resources to stem the tide of addictions. Tempe is now one of hundreds of cities using Halden’s wastewater monitoring system.

    See also: Sewage is helping cities flush out the opioid crisis, Scientific American, May 25

    Tempe partners with ASU to study city wastewater to monitor public health, ABC 15 News – Phoenix, May 25

    Tempe. ASU to study wastewater for clues about opiod abuse, Cronkite News, May 24, and the Arizona Republic, May 31

    Tempe partners with ASU to detect drugs in wastewater, KJZZ (NPR), May 23

    ASU, Tempe testing for opioids in city’s sewage system, KTAR News, May 29

  • Preliminary Report: Self-Driving Uber Car Didn’t Alert Driver Of Collision Possibility

    Preliminary Report: Self-Driving Uber Car Didn’t Alert Driver Of Collision Possibility

    The National Transportation Safety Board released its preliminary report on the self-driving Uber vehicle that struck and killed a pedestrian in Tempe. Lina Karam, a Fulton Schools professor of computer engineering, commented on what measures could be taken to help prevent such tragic mishaps. She recommended requiring stringent qualifications for operators to ensure their ability to safely control self-driving vehicles and incorporating into the vehicles a process that quickly alerts drivers to problems with autonomous systems.

     

  • Trashed cellphones sparking fires; ASU team working to make lithium batteries safer

    Trashed cellphones sparking fires; ASU team working to make lithium batteries safer

    Lithium-ion batteries commonly used in cell phones, laptop computers, cameras, power tools and electric cars are being linked to numerous fires breaking out in landfills where these electronic tools and devices are being dumped, as well as fires in garbage trucks. In a news report on the dangers of disposing of these electronics, Hanqing Jiang, a Fulton Schools professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering, describes his research on using a layer of silicone inside lithium-ion and lithium-air batteries to reduce the threat of such fires.

  • Determining the Optimal Biomarker Frequency for Biosensors

    Determining the Optimal Biomarker Frequency for Biosensors

    Chi-En Lin’s research and development of multi-biomarker technology to diagnose diseases earned him the highly sought-after Metrohm USA’s Young Chemist Award earlier this year. In an interview with a major international health and medical news outlet, the Fulton Schools biomedical engineering doctoral student talks in detail about advances in biosensors and biomarkers and their growing role in detecting and managing complex diseases and in the development of personalized medicine. Lin is conducting his research under the guidance of Fulton Schools Assistant Professor Jeffrey La Belle.

  • Fear and hope in the age of AI

    Fear and hope in the age of AI

    A far-ranging exploration of the challenges posed by a world that artificial intelligence technology is increasingly reshaping taps into the perspective of Subbarao Kambhampati, a Fulton Schools professor of computer science and engineering, and president of the international Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence. AI will definitely lead to “a reformulation of societies,” Kambhampati says, but much of what AI alters in our lives will amount to positive changes.

  • ASU students compete in urban search and rescue drone competition

    ASU students compete in urban search and rescue drone competition

    Six teams of Arizona State University students brought drones they had equipped with cameras and sensors to a campus gymnasium recently, where officials from the U.S. Department of Defense and the Federal Emergency Management Administration watched as teams launched their aerial vehicles into a simulated disaster response scenario. Plans are to make the competition an annual event to showcase aerial vehicle innovation at ASU and to motivate students to help develop the next generation of life-saving search and rescue technology.

     

  • Smart dressers: Technology flourishes in wearable fashion designs

    Smart dressers: Technology flourishes in wearable fashion designs

    Arizona State University’s newly established fashion program is already breaking into the innovation mode through creative partnerships pairing students in various disciplines. One in particular involves a collaborative fashion technology class project that tapped the talents of Fulton Schools students. Class member Jenna Forrey, a human systems engineering student, and computer science student Abhik Chowdhury are among those who joined fashion program students in delving into designs for clothing featuring wearable technology inspired by science and engineering. Forrey’s and Chowdhury’s contributions are noted in an earlier article, Moving the needle on fashion education, ASU NOW, March 28.

  • ASU’s Greenes receives 2018 Lifetime Achievement Award

    ASU’s Greenes receives 2018 Lifetime Achievement Award

    Authorship of numerous books on mathematics. Decades of research and teaching in the field. Directing Arizona State University’s PRIME Center to increase interest in STEM subjects among students from preschool to college. Editing the Arizona Association of Teachers of Mathematics semiannual journal OnCore and the monthly “MATHgazine Senior” and “MATHgazine Junior” online publications. Those are among accomplishments that have earned the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics Lifetime Achievement Award for Carole Greenes, a Fulton Schools professor of math education.

  • Hybridized Camaro speeds off to EcoCAR3 competition

    Hybridized Camaro speeds off to EcoCAR3 competition

    Arizona State University’s EcoCar3 team is one of the groups of students from 16 universities embarking on the first leg the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Vehicle Technology competition. Their challenge: Develop a car into an electric-gas fuel hybrid and put it to demanding road tests and a series of technical demonstrations and design reviews. Fulton Schools students make up most of ASU’s team. Abdel Ra’ouf Mayyas, a Fulton Schools assistant professor of automotive engineering is the team’s faculty adviser.

  • ASU’s Swimming Olympian to graduate

    ASU’s Swimming Olympian to graduate

    Ivana Ninkovic followed the achievement of becoming an Olympic athlete for her native Bosnia and Herzegovina by becoming the Fulton Schools Spring 2018 Outstanding Engineering Management Program Graduate. Ninkovic competed on the Arizona State University swim team throughout her undergraduate years. She says ASU and the Fulton Schools turned out to be the perfect choice to pursue both her academic and athletic goals.

  • Arizona is poised to capitalize on growing microelectronic industry

    Arizona is poised to capitalize on growing microelectronic industry

    Arizona — especially the Phoenix metro area — is expected to benefit significantly from a global upswing in the microelectronics industry. Companies already in the state are expanding operations while others are relocating to the region. Local business leaders say that is certain to send companies to Arizona State University and other Arizona colleges and universities looking for new engineering talent. Details are in a report by the Greater Phoenix Economic Council.

  • Textbooks reveal lack in science education

    Textbooks reveal lack in science education

    Teaming with former ASU graduate student Rachel Yoho, Fulton Schools Professor Bruce Rittmann discovered that many introductory science textbooks give scant attention to some of today’s major environmental topics, particularly climate change and renewable energy technologies. Their findings are detailed in a paper recently published in the research journal Environmental Communication.

    See also: Very few pages devoted to climate change in introductory science textbooks, Science Daily, April 30

  • Nanotechnology Fuels Safe Lithium Ion Batteries

    Nanotechnology Fuels Safe Lithium Ion Batteries

    What Fulton Schools associate professor of materials science and engineering Candace Chan describes as a “very beautiful” metal oxide nanowire material may help produce the next generation of advanced battery technologies. The American Society of Mechanical Engineers reports that Chan’s research group has developed a new technique for making the material that improves the safety of lithium-ion batteries. A paper published in the research journal Applied Energy Materials reveals the science and engineering involved in the novel process.

  • ASU researchers create hexacopter to help keep Arizona canals clean

    ASU researchers create hexacopter to help keep Arizona canals clean

    The Salt River Project utility will be monitoring the environmental health of its 180 miles of canals in the Phoenix metro area with special drones developed by Fulton Schools faculty members and students, including Assistant Professors Wenlong Zhang and Panagiotis Polygerinos and graduate student Shatadal Mishra. Hexacopter drones will collect water samples from the canals that will be examined for contaminants.

    See also: SRP teams with ASU to develop high-tech drones Fox 10 News Phoenix, May 1

  • Engineering graduate student powers through illness

    Engineering graduate student powers through illness

    A tumor seriously impaired Fulton School student Stefano Chang’s vision and threatened to end his quest for a master’s degree in software engineering. He found a way to keep from getting too far behind in his schoolwork while enduring long hours of medical treatment. During the same time, he did the groundwork for his own software consulting business. Chang will receive his degree at the end of the spring semester.

     

April

2018
  • Finding passion in research that makes an impact

    Finding passion in research that makes an impact

    Motivated by a desire to find solutions to the drug-abuse crises afflicting countries throughout the world, Fulton Schools civil environmental and sustainable engineering doctoral student Adam Gushgari plans to work on establishing an environmental monitoring startup company soon after receiving his degree this semester. The idea for the venture is rooted in the research he conducted under Fulton Schools Professor Rolf Halden in the area of wastewater epidemiology.

  • To monitor the health of cities’ residents, look no further than their sewers

    To monitor the health of cities’ residents, look no further than their sewers

    Fulton Schools Professor Rolf Halden is among researchers expanding knowledge about human health through the emerging field of wastewater-based epidemiology. With their Human Health Observatory, a repository of samples from more than 300 water treatment plants around the world, Halden and his team at the Center for Environmental Health Engineering are compiling a large volume of valuable data that sheds light on the “metabolism” of large urban populations.

  • ASU entrepreneurs win more than $300,000 to nurture ventures

    ASU entrepreneurs win more than $300,000 to nurture ventures

    Several Fulton Schools students were among those to emerge from the ASU Venture Devils program’s competitive Demo Day event with funding for entrepreneurial efforts. Biomedical engineering doctoral student Nicholas Hool got support for earbud devices that help alleviate stress. Ann Grimes and Christian Coleman, who are receiving mechanical engineering degrees this spring, earned support for their flood irrigation control device. Chemical engineering student Alyssa Carlson and her Engineering Projects in Community Service team mates received funds to develop recreational and business opportunities in the small Shonto community in Navajo County, Arizona

  • Exploring — and learning — as an adventure

    Exploring — and learning — as an adventure

    With his degree from the Fulton Schools in information management technology — with a focus on entrepreneurship, Jay Patel plans to return to India and apply what he has learned in college to improving the quality of life in his homeland. Ventures to provide communities quality food at lower prices and a smart shopping app are on his agenda.

  • Students test their wits, showcase intelligence at the ASU Academic Bowl

    Students test their wits, showcase intelligence at the ASU Academic Bowl

    The winning team in the recent 2018 ASU Academic Bowl was captained by Fulton Schools aerospace engineering student Allan Garry. He helped lead his team to victory over another team of Fulton Schools students in the academic trivia competition’s championship round. Team members split more than $20,000 in scholarship money.

  • Could hydropanels creating water out of air be a solution to shortages?

    Could hydropanels creating water out of air be a solution to shortages?

    Zero Mass Water, an energy tech startup founded by Cody Friesen, a Fulton Schools associate professor of materials science and engineering, has developed technology that produces water by capturing moisture out of the air. Using a special system of hydropanels similar to panels used in solar energy systems, the technology can produce about 20 16-ounce bottled of water per day. The systems have already been used to help provide water in some of the places around the world suffering the most severe shortages.

  • Catalyst: The swarm intelligence behind self-driving cars

    Catalyst: The swarm intelligence behind self-driving cars

    Under the direction of Fulton Schools Assistant Professor Spring Berman, engineering students in ASU’s Autonomous Collective Systems Laboratory are looking at how “swarm intelligence” found in nature (think of how individual ants coordinate their labors within their colonies) can be mimicked to design and program robots in ways that could be applied to making advances in self-driving vehicle technologies.

     

  • US Pakistan Centers For Advanced Studies In Energy Organizes Research Expo

    US Pakistan Centers For Advanced Studies In Energy Organizes Research Expo

    Efforts by ASU and the Fulton Schools to support endeavors to bring clean, renewable and sustainable sources of energy to countries around the world is exemplified by USPCAS-E, the U.S-Pakistan Centers for Advanced Studies in Energy.  A recent exhibition at ASU showcased more than 40 research projects by USPCAS-E partners focusing on renewable energy, thermal energy, electrical energy, and energy policy. Fulton Schools Professor Sayfe Kiaei is the director of the USPCAS-E project.

  • Here’s why Phoenix is a great place to build a tech company

    Here’s why Phoenix is a great place to build a tech company

    With the deep pool of talent offered by its 20,000 students, ASU’s Fulton Schools are a major factor that is making the Phoenix metro area a more attractive environment for entrepreneurs, investors and existing businesses that want to establish new tech companies. Since 2010, more than 68 percent of ASU graduates have been staying in the area to find employment.

  • Will a robot take your job? At least one-third of Phoenix-area positions are vulnerable, study says

    Will a robot take your job? At least one-third of Phoenix-area positions are vulnerable, study says

    Robots are certain to have a growing impact on employment in the U.S. in the near future. Robotics technologies still have a long way to go to effectively perform many human skills, but more and more robots have the ability to work compatibly with humans in a variety of work environments, says Heni Ben Amor, a Fulton Schools assistant professor of computer science and robotics.

  • EPICS High School gives AZ students tools to change the world

    EPICS High School gives AZ students tools to change the world

    ASU’s service learning program Engineering Projects in Community Service, for middle schools and high schools — supported by the Fulton Schools — is giving young students experience in technical problem-solving, research, design and community involvement. Recent award-winning EPICS projects include a system that helps teachers locate students in an emergency, a redesign of an Audubon Society gift shop, a portable workplace that attaches to a wheelchair, and a monument and sign for a facility serving families in transition.

     

  • ASU engineering the future in wearable robotics

    ASU engineering the future in wearable robotics

    Fulton Schools faculty members Thomas Sugar, Panagiotis Polygerinos and Panagiotis Artemiadis are among researchers contributing to technological advances in wearable robotic devices. Among their projects are robotic exoskeletons designed to aid military and industrial operations, robotic systems to help stroke victims regain mobility, a “jetpack” to help people run faster and a robotic prosthetic ankle for amputees.

     

  • Student pilots prepare for emergencies at ASU in Mesa

    Student pilots prepare for emergencies at ASU in Mesa

    Ryan Nolan and Mitch McCoy, seniors in the Fulton Schools Aeronautical Management Technology program, were featured in a simulation of how pilots are trained to respond to emergencies during flight. The report also features Fulton Schools flight instructor and airline pilot Mike Edmonds, a graduate of the program. The simulation was based on a recent incident in which a major airline’s passenger jet had to make a dramatic emergency landing.

  • Sanitary District tapped for ASU wastewater project

    Sanitary District tapped for ASU wastewater project

    A team of Fulton Schools civil and environmental engineering students took on a challenge to purify wastewater to make it safe for human consumption. The project — conducted at a water treatment plant in the town of Fountain Hills, near Scottsdale — was part of the American Society of Civil Engineers Pacific Southwest Conference annual student competitions, which were held this year at Arizona State University. The water treatment competition required students to sufficiently remove contaminants so that the water met drinking standards.

     

  • ASU Students Propose Plans To Help Tempe Renewable Energy Initiative

    ASU Students Propose Plans To Help Tempe Renewable Energy Initiative

    The city of Tempe is being aided in its quest to convert to renewable energy sources by students in the Fulton Schools Solar Energy Engineering and Commercialization master’s degree program directed by Professor Ron Roedel. Those students worked with others from ASU’s W.P. Carey School of Business to develop strategies for transitioning to renewables that Roedel presented to city leaders.

  • Pakistan-US Center For Advanced Studies’ First Graduation Ceremony Held At University Of Sciences And Technology

    Pakistan-US Center For Advanced Studies’ First Graduation Ceremony Held At University Of Sciences And Technology

    Close to 100 students are the first to receive Master of Science degrees in energy engineering through U.S.-Pakistan Centers for Advanced Studies in Energy, known as USPCAS-E. The USPCAS-E program is a partnership between Arizona State University, Oregon State University, the National University of Science and Technology in Pakistan and the University of Engineering and Technology Peshawar. Fulton Schools Professor Sayfe Kiaei is the director of the USPCAS-E project. Each semester a cohort of students and faculty from the two universities in Pakistan come to ASU to work with several Fulton Schools faculty in their labs.

    Read also: Energy technology grads national asset, says minister, The Express Tribune (Pakistan), April 19

  • Float or sink? Students test concrete canoes at Tempe Town Lake

    Float or sink? Students test concrete canoes at Tempe Town Lake

    The annual American Society of Civil Engineers Pacific Southwest Conference student competitions recently came to Arizona State University for the first time in almost two decades. ASU and Northern Arizona University co-hosted about 1,500 students from 18 universities in California, Hawaii, Nevada and Arizona for the event. Teams of Fulton Schools students and their peers at the other schools squared off in about a dozen different contests, including the popular concrete canoe competition held at Tempe Town Lake.

     

  • EcoCAR 3 development races toward the finish line

    EcoCAR 3 development races toward the finish line

    Fulton Schools students are among members of an Arizona State University team preparing for a national competition sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy and General Motors to convert a standard gasoline-fueled car into a gas-electric hybrid vehicle. The final phases of the competition begin May 10 and involve seeing how the automobile performs on a drive from Yuma, Arizona to Fontana California.

     

  • Lifeblood Of The Desert: Salt River Project Teams Turn To ASU Robots To Maintain Canal System

    Lifeblood Of The Desert: Salt River Project Teams Turn To ASU Robots To Maintain Canal System

    Water quality in the greater Phoenix area depends heavily on the Salt River Project utility’s ability to maintain its 131 miles of canals. SRP is getting help with that chore from Fulton Schools researchers. Assistant Professors Wenlong Zhang, Panagiotis Polygerinos and Dan Aukes, along with doctoral student Mohammad Sharifzedah, are employing various robotic technologies they’ve developed in their labs — including quadcopters and nature-mimicking robotic fish — to aid in keeping water in the canals clean.

  • ASU Air Devils build and pilot their award-winning planes from the ground up

    ASU Air Devils build and pilot their award-winning planes from the ground up

    Fulton Schools students in an aerospace engineering club are taking the reins in preparing an Arizona State University team for a major annual national competition sponsored by the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics. They’ve spent many months designing, building and testing the small remote-control airplanes the team will take to the event.

  • ASU’s Tooker House earns awards at Student Housing Conference

    ASU’s Tooker House earns awards at Student Housing Conference

    The newest Fulton Schools campus student residential complex, the Tooker House, won multiple awards at a recent national student housing industry conference. The awards included Best Architecture and Design, Best Use of Green & Sustainable Construction or Development and Best Public-Private Partnership Development. The Tooker House also features high-tech amenities and work spaces where student can collaborate on projects and use tools such as 3D printers and laser cutters.

  • Should Autonomous Car Makers Slow Down Testing?

    Should Autonomous Car Makers Slow Down Testing?

    Fulton Schools Associate Professor Aviral Shrivastava’s expertise is in embedded computers, one of the technologies that make self-driving cars possible. He agrees that it’s prudent for the autonomous vehicle industry to cut back its testing of the cars on public streets until flaws that are raising concerns are remedied.

  • Tempe hoping tiny homes help solve city’s affordable housing issue

    Tempe hoping tiny homes help solve city’s affordable housing issue

    The Humble Homes project developed by Arizona State University engineering students may help the city of Tempe remedy its shortage of affordable housing. The students have mapped out the landscape for an urban “micro home” community. Some of them may get a chance to be involved in actually building the cluster of 600-square-foot domiciles.

    Read also: Tiny homes aim to help tackle Tempe’s not-so-tiny housing problem, The State Press, April 10

     

  • Making Thunderbirds cooler than ever

    Making Thunderbirds cooler than ever

    Air Force veteran Christopher Ames considers the classic Ford Thunderbird “an icon of American automotive engineering.” But he discovered the one he acquired at an auto auction was plagued by a common problem of old Thunderbirds: rapid engine overheating. He went on a mission to solve the problem that led him to a Fulton Schools thermal and fluids engineering course taught by mechanical engineering instructor Mark Miner. The result: There is now a new redesigned auto part that corrects coolant flow problems in Thunderbirds being reviewed by the U.S. Patent Office.   

  • Is the Military Really Going to Start Drafting 40-Year-Old Hackers?

    Is the Military Really Going to Start Drafting 40-Year-Old Hackers?

    It may be time for an extensive re-engineering of U.S. national defense, writes Brad Allenby, an Arizona State University President’s Professor in the Fulton Schools. He proposes as the cornerstone of the project a universal national service requirement that would involve adults of all ages in protecting the country. Offering his views through the Future Tense partnership, Allenby says this approach could help the military and the country benefit from a broad range of skills — and may even foster a more cohesive American democracy.

  • ASU Professor Receives Stockholm Water Prize

    ASU Professor Receives Stockholm Water Prize

    Fulton Schools Professor Bruce Rittman is interviewed about the advances in environmental biotechnology that recently earned him the Stockholm Water Prize from the Stockholm International Water Institute. His lab uses the natural functions performed by microorganisms to remove pollutants from water. He is also exploring ways to put those contaminants to work for positive purposes.

  • Helping smart cities use big data, connected technology for good

    Helping smart cities use big data, connected technology for good

    Arizona State University’s new Center for Smart Cities and Regions is focusing on helping communities employ the internet of things and other new technologies to enhance their economic, social and cultural health. Among the center’s projects is building a “smart campus” that “makes the ASU community experience better.” That may involve using more of the voice-activated Amazon Echo devices that the Fulton Schools has already supplied to students in the new Tooker House campus residence complex.

     

  • Shaking up proteins with engineering

    Shaking up proteins with engineering

    Combining his expertise in chemical engineering and structural biology, Fulton Schools Assistant Professor Brent Nannenga is expanding what we know about the structures of proteins. With that knowledge he will use proteins to make inorganic nanomaterials that could be used to develop new pharmaceutical drugs to treat a variety of ailments from hypertension and asthma to acid reflux and allergies. The work will involve a novel electron crystallography technique that Nannega developed.

  • Tech behind cryptocurrency craze could disrupt medicine, housing and ID security

    Tech behind cryptocurrency craze could disrupt medicine, housing and ID security

    Virtual money systems known as cryptocurrency function through a vast network of databases called blockchain. As the technology evolves, cryptocurrencies will be used by growing numbers of businesses, industries and governments, say experts such as Fulton Schools Associate Research Professor Dragan Boscovic. He is the technical director for Arizona State University’s Center for Assured and Scalable Data Engineering, known as CASCADE, where researchers are working with the cryptocurrency company Dash to make blockchain more secure and more energy efficient in its use of the computing power it requires. Such progress will help make use of blockchain more mainstream, Boscovic says.

  • Taking the “waste” out of “wastewater”

    Taking the “waste” out of “wastewater”

    Development of advanced microbiology processes that could enable the conversion of pollutants and contaminants in wastewater into valuable resources helped win the prestigious international Stockholm Water Prize for Fulton Schools Professor Bruce Rittmann and Professor Mark van Loosdrecht at Delft University of Technology in the Netherlands. In an interview about their work, they explain how a new generation of water treatments could capture useful chemical and nutrients from wastewater. See page 18 of the digital magazine.

March

2018
  • Flying cars are coming, and they’ll be autonomous

    Flying cars are coming, and they’ll be autonomous

    Advances appear to be on the horizon for what is being called urban aerial mobility technology — what some might also call flying cars and taxis. Fulton Schools Associate Professor Daniel Bliss is working on designs for navigation and positioning systems for these self-driving automobiles/aircraft. Bliss says the success of such vehicles will require a fusion of multiple technologies, including sensors, scanning lasers, and sophisticated ground-positioning systems and antennae systems.

    See also: ASU professor develops technology for self-flying quadcopter, 3TV/CBS 5 News (Phoenix)

  • Mind-Controlled Robotics

    Mind-Controlled Robotics

    Robots that can be controlled by signals from the human brain have the potential to become an effective physical therapy tool, says Panagiotis Artemiadis, a Fulton Schools associate professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering. His research includes using mind-controlled robotic systems to aid people in recovering mobility after suffering a stroke.

  • Full STEAM ahead: ASU faculty work to integrate arts into STEM

    Full STEAM ahead: ASU faculty work to integrate arts into STEM

    Professors are integrating aspects of arts studies into their teaching of science, technology, engineering and math. Associate Research Professor Tirupalavanam Ganesh, the assistant dean of engineering education for Fulton Schools, says engineering is a creative profession. So he focuses on teaching his students habits and methods for unlocking their imaginations and bringing an artful perspective to their engineering endeavors.

  • Some experts doubt new metal tariffs will boost national security

    Some experts doubt new metal tariffs will boost national security

    New tariffs that increase the costs for some countries of importing steel and metals into the United States could have ramifications for the U.S. military and defense industries. Some national leaders say the tariffs will help strengthen national security. Fulton Schools Professor Brad Allenby is among experts who say that is a disputable claim and that the tariffs might have negative impacts on the overall economy.

     

  • The data defenders

    The data defenders

    Many faculty members and their students in the School of Computing, Informatics, and Decision Systems Engineering in the Fulton Schools are involved in research aimed at helping to protect the personal information stored on the electronic technologies we use every day. They’re applying expertise in computer science, cybersecurity, data mining, digital forensics and biosecurity to help prevent our “digital footprints” from making us vulnerable. The article also appears in the spring 2018 issue of ASU Thrive magazine.

  • Autonomous vehicles traveling the wrong road to safety, engineer says

    Autonomous vehicles traveling the wrong road to safety, engineer says

    Self-driving cars are mimicking the unsafe driving habits of humans, says Aviral Shrivastava, a Fulton Schools associate professor of computer science. He teaches embedded computing courses that challenge students to engineer self-navigating toy cars with sensing tools to enable the vehicles to avoid driving into obstacles around them. The priority for autonomous cars should be safety, he says, not designing them to provide a human-like driving experience. His research is looking at how to build a self-driving car that can apply its brakes within a millisecond of detecting obstacles.

    Read also: Should autonomous car makers slow down testing, KJZZ (NPR), April 10

  • 5 GROWTH AREAS FOR PHOENIX AND THE ENGINEERS WHO ARE MAKING IT HAPPEN

    5 GROWTH AREAS FOR PHOENIX AND THE ENGINEERS WHO ARE MAKING IT HAPPEN

    Tech industries in particular benefit from university researchers who have the freedom and the skills to explore big ideas and big questions and experiment with potential applications and solutions. Progress in five major areas of technological innovation contributing to economic growth in Greater Phoenix is a reflection of the wide range of engineering research strengths found among the Fulton Schools faculty.

     

  • Biotech pioneers Bruce Rittmann and Mark van Loosdrecht win 2018 Stockholm Water Prize

    Biotech pioneers Bruce Rittmann and Mark van Loosdrecht win 2018 Stockholm Water Prize

    “Traditionally, we have just thought of pollutants as something to get rid of, but now we’re beginning to see them as potential resources that are just in the wrong place.” That statement by Arizona State University Regents’ Professor Bruce Rittmann reflects the kinds of creative problem-solving approaches that have earned the Fulton Schools environmental engineer one of the most prestigious international awards in his field. Rittmann and a fellow environmental biotechnology researcher have been awarded the Stockholm Water Prize for the global impacts of their innovations in water treatment processes that are energy-efficient, cost-saving and exceedingly effective in removing contaminants and recycling valuable chemicals and nutrients.

  • ASU using sewage to measure opioid use, abuse

    ASU using sewage to measure opioid use, abuse

    Fulton Schools Professor Rolf Halden and his research team at Arizona State University’s Center for Environmental Health Engineering are at the forefront of advancing techniques for analyzing the contents of wastewater to assess public health risks. A new project focuses on detecting the presence of opioids in sewage. The real-time data such analyses can provide could help communities respond more effectively to rising use of the dangerous drug.

     

  • What Uber’s fatal accident could mean for the autonomous-car industry

    What Uber’s fatal accident could mean for the autonomous-car industry

    The first pedestrian fatality involving a self-driving car raises concerns that the industry is deploying the technology too fast, without first building all possible safety features into autonomous vehicles. Artificial intelligence expert Subbarao Kambhampati, a Fulton Schools professor of computer science, says the accident also raises questions about the capability of safety drivers to effectively monitor self-driving care systems.

    Kambhampati is also quoted in Uber Self-Driving Car Fatality Reveals the Technology’s Blind Spots” Scientific American March 21

  • ASU students help shoe designer step into innovation

    ASU students help shoe designer step into innovation

    Fulton Schools students applied their problem-solving talents in joining a local business owner to meld technological know-how and fashion sense in producing a stylish yet practical and comfortable new shoe. The student team used mechanical, electrical and manufacturing engineering skills in the project done in a capstone engineering design class taught by Fulton Schools Assistant Professor Micah Lande.

  • Local expert and national reports indicate Arizona bridges are generally safe

    Local expert and national reports indicate Arizona bridges are generally safe

    Fatalities and serious injuries resulting from the recent collapse of a newly constructed pedestrian bridge in Florida has sparked concerns about the safety of bridges in many other states. Pingbo Tang, an assistant professor in the Fulton Schools’ Del E. Web School of Construction, says Arizona’s more than 8,000 bridges are generally safe, but the state’s heavy summer monsoon rains can erode soil around the foundations of bridges. That raises safety concerns, Tang says. He adds that the Arizona Department of Transportation also monitors bridges for potential damage from earthquakes, geological conditions and related factors, and that highway load limits are posted on structurally deficient bridges as a safety warning. See related coverage KTAR News (Phoenix)

  • Bitcoin classes proving popular in Illinois Colleges

    Bitcoin classes proving popular in Illinois Colleges

    Courses on blockchain technology, bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies are seeing a surge of students eager to learn about the digital currency wave sweeping across the financial landscape. At Arizona State University, the Fulton Schools’ Blockchain Research Lab gives students access to blockchain technology and opportunities to be part of the cryptocurrency design process, says Fulton Schools’ Dean Kyle Squires.

  • Scientists at ASU work with microgrids to power and empower impoverished communities

    Scientists at ASU work with microgrids to power and empower impoverished communities

    Systems engineering doctoral student Samantha Janko and senior electrical systems engineering student Alexander Mobley are helping to develop microgrid technologies as part of a larger endeavor to provide underserved communities access to reliable sources of energy and other vital resources, such as water. They’re part of the research team at the Laboratory for Energy and Power Solutions directed by Fulton Schools Assistant Professor Nathan Johnson.

  • Arizona becomes additive manufacturing (3-D printing) leader

    Arizona becomes additive manufacturing (3-D printing) leader

    The head of the Arizona Technology Council says it’s looking like the state could become a leader in the emerging high-tech field of additive manufacturing. That optimism is driven in part to advances being achieved by researchers at Arizona’s state universities. Dhruv Bhate, a Fulton Schools associate professor, is doing research to improve 3D metal printing. Some of his work is aimed at making an array of metal components that are lighter but still strong enough to be used in aerospace and defense industry applications.

     

  • Klaus Lackner didn’t set out to save the world, but he thinks his machine could help

    Klaus Lackner didn’t set out to save the world, but he thinks his machine could help

    The carbon-capture technology being built and tested by Fulton Schools Professor Klaus Lackner and his team at the Center for Negative Carbon Emissions could help reduce the impacts of climate change by pulling threatening concentrations of carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere. But even if the machinery is capable of making a big impact, there are economic and political hurdles to clear to put to the technology to work on a global scale.

  • CAN HUMANS SURVIVE ON WATER VAPOR ALONE?

    CAN HUMANS SURVIVE ON WATER VAPOR ALONE?

    A desert road trip provides a test site for a hydropanel designed to capture moisture from the atmosphere to produce water. The hydropanel is the technology developed by the Zero Mass Water company founded by Cody Friesen, a Fulton Schools Associate Professor of materials science and engineering. The nocturnal product testing out in the open Arizona desert was successful.

  • Lithium-related discovery could extend battery life, improve safety

    Lithium-related discovery could extend battery life, improve safety

    Electric-powered vehicles and many digital electronic devices could benefit from development of new mechanical engineering techniques that boost the energy storage capacity, life span and safety of lithium batteries. Fulton Schools Professor Hanqing Jiang and his research team have discovered methods for preventing uncontrolled lithium dendrite growth, which inhibits battery performance. Read more in Electronics 360, DesignNews, Mining.com, ChemEurope.com, V3. OilPrice.com

  • Coursera teams with 5 universities to expand its full masters and bachelors degree programs

    Coursera teams with 5 universities to expand its full masters and bachelors degree programs

    Arizona State University has joined four other leading universities in offering courses and degree programs through the online education platform Coursera. Studies in the Fulton Schools’ Master of Computer Science program will soon be available to online students — the first time ASU has hosted a degree program on a fully open scale platform. The online program aligns with ASU’s and Coursera’s efforts to make higher education more globally accessible. Read the Fulton Schools announcement.

  • The pros and cons of AI

    The pros and cons of AI

    Both threatening and hopeful depictions of advances in artificial intelligence technology continue to proliferate. AI is either a potential threat to society or a groundbreaking tool that will significantly improve our lives — depending on who’s making the predictions. Fulton Schools Professor Subbarao Kambhampati joins a fellow Arizona State University AI expert to provide perspectives on the debate.  

  • Groundbreaking indigenous architect signs on to ASU faculty

    Groundbreaking indigenous architect signs on to ASU faculty

    Wanda Dalla Costa will bring her perspectives on the construction of built environments that nurture our cultural connections to Arizona State University students as she teaches indigenous architecture as a newly named ASU Institute Professor. She has a cross-appointment in the Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts and the School of Sustainable and the Built Environment in the Fulton Schools. Her expertise spans culturally responsive design, sustainable-affordable housing, climatic resiliency in architecture and using built environments as a teaching tool. 

     

February

2018
  • ASU, Maricopa IDA partner to develop MedTech workforce

    ASU, Maricopa IDA partner to develop MedTech workforce

    Will a $2 million grant from the Maricopa County Industrial Development Authority, the Fulton Schools will lead a new workforce development project designed to boost innovation and entrepreneurship in the region. The effort will focus on preparing people to work in electronic technology in the medical field and in additive

  • Is Bitcoin the Future of State Income Tax Payments?

    Is Bitcoin the Future of State Income Tax Payments?

    Some states are considering allowing use of digital currency for payment of income taxes. Some critics contend it would bring risks and burdens to states’ tax-collection operations. But Fulton Schools Research Professor Dragan Boscovic, director of ASU’s Blockchain Research Lab, which focuses on the digital ledger system behind bitcoin, says the move could put states at the forefront of financial technology.

     

  • Designing a structure for the future, guided by the past

    Designing a structure for the future, guided by the past

    Hanging Jiang drew inspiration from the centuries-old art of paper folding — origami — to design a new mechanical structure that can unfold and lock to support large, heavy loads. The Fulton Schools professor says the new structure could be used to achieve more mechanical versatility in robotics, spacecraft and implantable medical devices, among many other potential applications. Jiang previously used the origami technique to develop stretchable batteries.

  • 5 Terracon women engineers diversifying the industry

    5 Terracon women engineers diversifying the industry

    Three Fulton Schools alumni are among five women with the engineering consulting firm Terracon who are profiled in a feature story published in conjunction with National Engineers Week. Brittany Dalton, Kendra Clouse and Marissa Raleigh play key roles in providing the company’s environmental, geotechnical, facilities and materials services, and also contribute to the workforce diversity that employers say maximizes innovation, creativity and competitiveness.

  • Marines acquire hundreds of quadcopter drones for infantry squads

    Marines acquire hundreds of quadcopter drones for infantry squads

    Remote-controlled drones, robotics and artificial intelligence are some of the advanced technologies being deployed on the battlefield and in other military operations. The trend is creating “techno-human” squads of soldiers working side-by-side with networked machines to carry out their missions, says Fulton School Professor Brad Allenby.

  • Should AI bots lie? Hard truths about artificial intelligence

    Should AI bots lie? Hard truths about artificial intelligence

    Fulton Schools computer scientists Tathagata Chakraborti and Subbarao Kambhampati discuss effective collaboration between humans and artificial intelligence technologies in a recent paper, Algorithms for the Greater Good!. They point out that it’s not enough to make AI smart. AI developers must make sure the AI bot works well with human intelligence, in all its wild variety, including different cultural norms, if we are to avoid serious problems.

  • China’s massive investment in artificial intelligence has an insidious downside

    China’s massive investment in artificial intelligence has an insidious downside

    China is on the cusp of pursuing big advances in artificial intelligence technologies and capabilities. Fulton Schools Professor Subbarao Kambhampati, president of the Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence, is among AI experts who say that raises expectations for breakthroughs in the field but also stokes worries about how the country may use AI systems to increase public surveillance and censorship,  and boost its military power.

  • Trump’s solar tariff and proposed energy cut troubles ASU professors

    Trump’s solar tariff and proposed energy cut troubles ASU professors

    Proposed budget cuts to the Department of Energy and a trade tariff on the photovoltaic panels that produce solar energy could burden the solar power industry and reduce energy research funding. A funding rollback could impact graduate students involved in research projects to earn their degrees, says Fulton Schools Assistant Professor Zachary Holman. The tariff may mean some tough times for solar technology installers but the movement toward renewable energy sources will continue growing, says Ron Roedel, director of the Fulton Schools’ Solar Energy Engineering and Commercialization master’s degree program.

  • ASU’s new Dash partnership fosters blockchain research and learning

    ASU’s new Dash partnership fosters blockchain research and learning

    A partnership with the cryptocurrency enterprise Dash will enable ASU’s Blockchain Research Lab, directed by Fulton Schools Research Professor Dragan Boscovic, to expand research into digital currency, establish a graduate course on blockchain technology and fund scholarships for students.

     

  • ‘Jackpotting’ reaches US shores, drain millions from ATM

    ‘Jackpotting’ reaches US shores, drain millions from ATM

    It’s a cyberspace form of bank robbery. Called “jackpotting,” it’s perpetrated by computer system hackers who find ways to get bank ATM machines to dispense large sums of money. Paulo Shakarian, a Fulton Schools Entrepreneurial Professor and director of Cyber-Socio Intelligent Systems Laboratory, says combating the crime will require close surveillance of the “dark web” to uncover the schemes of potential jackpotting hackers.

  • We Can Pull CO2 from Air, But It’s No Silver Bullet for Climate Change, Scientists Warn

    We Can Pull CO2 from Air, But It’s No Silver Bullet for Climate Change, Scientists Warn

    Fulton Schools Professor Klaus Lackner, director of ASU’s Center for Negative Carbon Emissions, says merely reducing emissions of carbon dioxide won’t be nearly enough to reduce the rising environmental threat from the buildup of greenhouses gases in the Earth’s atmosphere. It’s critical to also further develop and employ new carbon-capture technologies to remove significant amounts of the CO2 that’s already there.

     

  • Hoolest wins top prize at ASU Innovation Open

    Hoolest wins top prize at ASU Innovation Open

    Three Fulton Schools students won the grand prize of a $100,000 investment in their business venture idea at the ASU Innovation Open entrepreneurship competition. Nicholas Hool, Sami Mian and John Patterson make up the team behind Hoolest Performance Technologies. Their stress-relief product consists of earbuds that emit an electrical stimulation that activates the body’s relaxation response.

    Read also:

    Phoenix Business Journal: Meet the student startup that won$100,000in ASU/Avnet competition

    AZBIO:  Hoolest wins top prize at ASU Open

    KTAR Radio News: ASU student-led business wins $100K at Innovation Open

  • Freshman team outranks upperclassmen in national ‘Domesday’ competition

    Freshman team outranks upperclassmen in  national ‘Domesday’ competition

    Fulton Schools materials science and engineering students Joshua Burchard, Bryan Ugaz and Sayquon Washington went up against 10 teams of more experienced undergraduate and graduate students in a national geodesic dome design competition. Their medal dome project, featuring an intricate 3-D printed design that incorporated 31 polygons, earned the three freshmen the top prize.

  • ASU international students overcome challenges to succeed as Sun Devils

    ASU international students overcome challenges to succeed as Sun Devils

    Fulton Schools electrical engineering graduate student Anik Jha, a native of India, is among international students at ASU who say that while they face challenges going to school in the United States, but that the university works to help them acclimate to the social environment and to succeed in their academic endeavors.

  • The possibility of AI going rogue is more than just science fiction

    The possibility of AI going rogue is more than just science fiction

    Fulton Schools Assistant Professor Ted Pavlic talks about the need for engineers and scientists developing artificial intelligence technologies to be more aware of the potential for unintended consequences in employing AI systems in ways that might have harmful impacts.  Computer science major Matthew Acosta says students should get more training on the ethical issues revolving around the uses of AI.

January

2018
  • Astronauts Vs. Robots: The Case Against Sending Human Crews Beyond Low-Earth Orbit

    Astronauts Vs. Robots: The Case Against Sending Human Crews Beyond Low-Earth Orbit

    Robots are our best option for less risky and more effective space exploration, says Fulton Schools Associate Professor Panagiotis Artemiades, director of the Human-Oriented Robotics and Control Lab. Making robots our astronauts could free up time and funding for humans to focus on solving other technological challenges, as well as answering some big cosmological and philosophical questions about our world and the universe, says Forbes magazine’s technology, aerospace and astronomy writer.

  • Hackers bring “jackpotting” to the U.S.

    Hackers bring “jackpotting” to the U.S.

    A recent outbreak of cyberattacks targeting ATM machines has led to the theft of more than $1 million from banks in the United States. Fulton Schools Entrepreneurial Professor Paulo Shakarian, the CEO of a cybersecurity intelligence startup, said the company was able to track an uptick of communications on the dark web about new hacking hardware that’s been used in the ATM thefts, as well as the sale of a guidebook on such “jackpotting” schemes

  • Q&A: How can research support the new dod national defense strategy?

    Q&A: How can research support the new dod national defense strategy?

    The U.S. Department of Defense has developed a comprehensive new National Defense Strategy in response to the varied and complex technological challenges to ensuring the country’s security. Fulton Schools Professor of Practice Nadya Bliss, director of Arizona State University’s Global Security Initiative, talks about what university researchers are capable of doing to support the defense department’s goals.

  • New solar tariffs create uncertainty for Arizona renewables industry

    New solar tariffs create uncertainty for Arizona renewables industry

    Photovoltaic solar energy panels are among imports on which the United States recently placed significantly high trade tariffs. The action could have negative impacts on U.S. solar energy system installers, says Ron Roedel, a Fulton Schools professor emeritus who directs the Solar Energy Engineering and Commercialization graduate program.

  • Robots taking over the world? It’s a good thing, researchers say

    Robots taking over the world? It’s a good thing, researchers say

    The Southwest Robotics Symposium hosted by Arizona State University looked at how Artificial Intelligence technology applied to robotics systems can make the world a better place. Fulton Schools faculty members Panagiotis Artemiades, Thomas Sugar, Hamid Marvi and Heni Ben Amor describe AI as the mechanism that will enable robots to help humans in homes, work places, hospitals and almost everywhere else.

  • Trashing the old way of doing things

    Trashing the old way of doing things

    Fulton Schools student Surya Iyer’s idea to boost the efficiency of waste management won a spot in the finals of the ASU Innovation Open competition for a $100,000 grand prize. His prototype for a “smart” garbage container uses a sensor to detect how much trash is in a trash can and makes the information accessible remotely through internet-connected devices.

  • ASU student payloads selected to fly on blue origin space vehicle

    ASU student payloads selected to fly on blue origin space vehicle

    Ten Fulton Schools students make up two of the teams that earned a place in a technology competition involving the New Shepherd spacecraft and the rocket company Blue Origin, owned by Amazon founder Jeff Bezos. One team’s project will focus on measuring and collecting data on how space affects human sight, smell, taste tough and hearing. The other project will study how pollinating bees might react in space and what that would mean for efforts to establish agriculture away from Earth.

    See also: Parabolic Arc

  • New global futures initiative asks how humankind can extend earth’s habitability

    New global futures initiative asks how humankind can extend earth’s habitability

    Arizona State University is expanding its role in sustainability education and research with the establishment of the New Global Futures Initiative. Its directive is to “take a broad look at the trajectory of our planet” and to help figure out ways that we can manage the world “in ways that achieve sustainable habitability.” At the helm of the new initiative is Peter Schlosser, who now has a joint appointment in the Fulton Schools of Engineering.

  • Arizona State University Partners with DASH to fund research, scholarships

    Arizona State University Partners with DASH to fund research, scholarships

    Work led by Fulton Schools Research Professor Dragan Boscovic, director of ASU’s Blockchain Research Lab, has spurred formation of a partnership between the university and Dash, a leading blockchain-powered digital currency. In addition to research funding, the partnership will enable development of an online graduate Blockchain technology and application course and scholarships for undergraduate and graduate student research fellowships.

    See more news coverage: CoinJournalASU NowBitcoinistAZ Big MediaBlockTribuneDash Force NewsPhoenix Business Journal

     

  • Bashas’ installs revolutionary sub-zero industrial freezer

    Bashas’ installs revolutionary sub-zero industrial freezer

    Fulton Schools Assistant Professor Kristen Parrish and sustainable engineering doctoral student Neda Askari are helping the Basha’s grocery chain improve the energy efficiency and cost savings of its industrial-scale food freezer storage. Working with the Salt River Project power utility and the Viking Cold Solutions company, they will be assessing whether the thermal energy storage system model they’ve developed can be adapted for other industrial facilities.

  • Valle Luna “Making a Difference”- ASU’s Kyle Williams

    Valle Luna “Making a Difference”- ASU’s Kyle Williams

    Kyle Williams, wide receiver for the Arizona State University Sun Devils football team and Fulton Schools biomedical engineering student, has his sights sets on becoming an orthopedic surgeon. Professor Marco Santello, director of the School of Biological and Health Systems Engineering, explains how Williams and other students in the same degree program are preparing for medical school by learning about the latest in neuroscience, tissue engineering, synthetic biology, neurorehabilitation and related biomedical areas.

  • ASU developing biodegradable plastics made from bacteria

    ASU developing biodegradable plastics made from bacteria

    Billions of metric tons of discarded plastics are posing an environmental hazard around the world. Research by Fulton Schools Assistant Professor Taylor Weiss could help to diminish that threat. He’s designing a “symbiotic partnership” between two forms of bacteria to make bioplastics that would harmlessly biodegrade at a relatively rapid pace.

  • Questioning AI: What are the key research challenges?

    Questioning AI: What are the key research challenges?

    Fulton Schools Professor Subbarao Kambhampati is featured in the debut episode of the science and technology podcast miniseries “Questioning Artificial Intelligence.” He joins another leading AI research in exploring issues arising from the proliferation of AI technologies and their widely varying applications. Kambhampati is the president of the international Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence.

December

2017
  • Unfiltered Fervor: The Rush to Get Off the Water Grid

    Unfiltered Fervor: The Rush to Get Off the Water Grid

    Zero Mass Water, a startup company that grew out of research led by Cody Friesen, a Fulton Schools associate professor of materials science, is among purveyors of what is being called “live water,” “raw water” or “real water.” They’re part of the “water consciousness movement” that is sparking debates about the pros and cons of water treatment infrastructure and water purification processes, and the resulting health benefits or drawbacks of both treated and untreated water.

  • Gallium nitride processor: Next-generation technology for space exploration

    Gallium nitride processor: Next-generation technology for space exploration

    Gallium nitride is a promising new semiconductor material with properties that enable it to operate at higher voltages, frequencies and temperatures at higher efficiencies than silicon. With support from NASA, Fulton Schools Assistant Professor Yuji Zhao and his research team are working on ways to use the material to develop a high-temperature microprocessor for space mission applications. The article was also published by  Tech News n’ GadgetsPhys.org, and ECN (Electronics Component News) magazine.  Read more about Zhao’s gallium nitride research.

  • Can We Suck Enough CO2 From The Air to Save The Climate?

    Can We Suck Enough CO2 From The Air to Save The Climate?

    As much as alternative energy sources such and solar and wind power might help reduce the detrimental impacts of climate change, what would really help is technology that removes greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. Fulton Schools professor Klaus Lackner, a pioneer of carbon-capture technology, thinks that cost-efficient systems to remove carbon dioxide are a surmountable challenge.

  • ASU Explores Groundbreaking Collaboration With Vietnam

    ASU Explores Groundbreaking Collaboration With Vietnam

    Ongoing global outreach efforts led by the Fulton Schools to help modernize higher education in Vietnam are bringing benefits to both research and education at Arizona State University. The signing of a new collaboration agreement between ASU and one of Vietnam’s leading universities will enable more long-term joint ventures, including student and faculty exchange programs and new research projects, as well as economic development and entrepreneurship opportunities. Read more.

  • AI in 2017 can’t nearly match the smarts of ‘Star Wars’ Droids

    AI in 2017 can’t nearly match the smarts of ‘Star Wars’ Droids

    Artificial intelligence technology that thinks, understands humans and acts accordingly? For now, you will see it only in fiction like the “Star Wars” movies, says computer scientist, robotics and AI expert Subbarao Kambhampati. Progress is being made in developing AI that can assist people, says the Fulton Schools professor, but we are still far, far away from seeing something with the intellectual capabilities and emotional intuition of the “Star Wars” droids R2-D2 and BB-8.

  • One Step At A Time

    One Step At A Time

    A soft robotic exosuit developed in a project led by Fulton Schools Assistant Professors Panagiotis Polygerinos and Wenlong Zhang is being tested by the Barrow Neurological Institute therapists for use in helping stroke victims regain mobility. Systems engineering doctoral students Saivimal Sridar and Zhi (George) Qiao are also involved in the research on the exosuit being conducted in Zhang’s Robotics and Intelligent Systems Lab and the Bio-inspired Mechatronics Lab directed by Polygerinos.

November

2017
  • Sandstone and metal louvres wrap massive student housing complex in Arizona

    Sandstone and metal louvres wrap massive student housing complex in Arizona

    The popular international architecture and design website gave a big photo spread to the Fulton Schools’ new student residence complex, the Tooker House. The architects are lauded for a design theme that mimics the colors and textures of Arizona’s Sonoran Desert environment.

  • Robotic fish could help solve problem in Arizona canals

    Robotic fish could help solve problem in Arizona canals

    A team of engineering doctoral students led by Fulton Schools Assistant Professor Daniel Aukes is developing robotic fish as a potential tool for the Salt River Project power and water utility. The robo-fish could help reduce the overgrowth of pondweed and other underwater vegetation that is hindering water flow in SRP’s canal system in the Phoenix metro area.

  • Real ‘Mission Impossible’: Thwarting hackers with individuals’ biosignals

    Real ‘Mission Impossible’: Thwarting hackers with individuals’ biosignals

    The next big thing in technology designed to defend against hackers could come from Jae-sun Seo, a Fulton Schools professor of electrical engineering, and his research collaborators. They are developing security authentication based on the electrical activity of an individuals’ heartbeats. It may offer advantages over even the fingerprint, retinal-scan and facial-recognition technologies being used to protect systems and devices from getting hacked.

  • Can Carbon-Dioxide Removal Save the World?

    Can Carbon-Dioxide Removal Save the World?

    We should look at carbon dioxide in our atmosphere like we look at garbage and sewage: as a waste product to be disposed of to protect our human and environmental health, says Fulton Schools professor Klaus Lackner. Research directed by Lackner at the Center for Negative Carbon Emissions focuses on developing carbon-capture technology to help reduce the potentially dangerous buildup of carbon dioxide around the world.

  • I’m a pacifist, so why don’t I support the Campaign to Stop Killer Robots?

    I’m a pacifist, so why don’t I support the Campaign to Stop Killer Robots?

    Fulton Schools Professor Subbarao Kambhampati responds to a call for a ban on autonomous robotic weapons with a warning about what negative unintended consequences might arise from such a drastic restriction. Kambhampati is president of the international Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence.

  • Meet Zero Mass Water, Whose Solar Panels Pull Drinking Water From The Air

    Meet Zero Mass Water, Whose Solar Panels Pull Drinking Water From The Air

    Fulton Schools associate professor of materials science and engineering Cody Freisen used nanomaterials, physics and solar energy to create his startup venture, Zero Mass Water. The technology, which produces drinkable water by capturing moisture from the air, could help water-deprived regions throughout the world.

  • Endovantage gains US FDA 510(k) clearance for Surgicalpreview

    Endovantage gains US FDA 510(k) clearance for Surgicalpreview

    David Frakes, a Fulton Schools associate professor of biomedical engineering, is one of the founders of the Endovantage venture. The company has gotten approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for a new tool for preoperative planning. Called Surgical Preview, it is designed to enable physicians to use 3D modeling and visualization of surgical placement of endovascular devices in patients. The goal is to reduce the risks to patients and improve outcomes.

  • POLYTECHNIC STUDENTS TRY ROBOTS ON REAL-WORLD PROBLEMS

    POLYTECHNIC STUDENTS TRY ROBOTS ON REAL-WORLD PROBLEMS

    In the IDEAlab and the Robotics and Intelligent Systems Laboratory on ASU Polytechnic campus, students work under the guidance of Fulton Schools assistant professors Daniel Aukes and Wenlong Zhang on applying robotics engineering to solve real challenges. Like using autonomous robotic fish to help a utility company control growth of vegetation in canals so that it doesn’t hinder water transport.  

October

2017
  • ASU STUDENTS ARE USING ROBOTS TO SOLVE PROBLEMS FROM HEALTH TO PUBLIC SAFETY

    ASU STUDENTS ARE USING ROBOTS TO SOLVE PROBLEMS FROM HEALTH TO PUBLIC SAFETY

    Fulton Schools assistant professors Dan Aukes, Wenlong Zhang and Panagiotis Polygerinos talk about how their students are helping to overcome technological challenges “one robot at a time.” Working in the Robotics and Intelligent Systems Laboratory and the IDEAlab, students are using robotics to pursue solutions in a wide range of fields, including transportation, national defense, energy systems, environmental health, communications and earth and space exploration.

  • VOICING A TECH REVOLUTION AT ARIZONA STATE

    VOICING A TECH REVOLUTION AT ARIZONA STATE

    Amazon’s Alexa-enabled Echo Dot voice technology available to Arizona State University engineering students living in the spacious new Tooker House campus residential complex reflects the Fulton Schools mission to “merge the living environment with the learning environment,” says Kyle Squires, dean of the Fulton Schools. The idea is to help students to experience the emerging revolution in information technology science and engineering.

  • MIND-CONTROLLED DRONE SWARMS COULD SOON PUT MORE EYES IN THE SKY

    MIND-CONTROLLED DRONE SWARMS COULD SOON PUT MORE EYES IN THE SKY

    The collective behavior of birds and fish are among things that have guided Fulton Schools Associate Professor Panagiotis Artemiadis in developing “swarm paradigms” for drones that can be directed through brain-technology interface systems. He sees these systems being used to aid search-and-rescue missions, exploration, security, fighting of wildfires and even farming.

    See Also:

    MIND-CONTROLLED DRONE FLEETS ARE COMING, RESEARCHER SAYS, THE DRIVE, OCTOBER 20

  • AUTISM IS NOT MY IDENTITY: HOW A CAVE CREEK TEEN LOST HIS DIAGNOSIS

    AUTISM IS NOT MY IDENTITY: HOW A CAVE CREEK TEEN LOST HIS DIAGNOSIS

    Fulton Schools mechanical engineering student Mark Macluskie’s path to college was opened at an early age when home-schooling and behavioral therapies implemented by his mother helped him overcome the challenges of a diagnosis of autism as an infant. Years later his academic performance has helped him win a coveted Flinn Scholarship to support his undergraduate studies in engineering and mathematics at Arizona State University.

  • ASU ENGINEERS DEVELOPING EDIBLE MEDICAL DEVICES

    ASU ENGINEERS DEVELOPING EDIBLE MEDICAL DEVICES

    Research into the use of food as an electrical component is bringing Professor Hanqing Jiang and his lab team closer to developing food-based electronic materials as ingestible biomedical devices. For now, the work is focusing on their use as a non-invasive diagnostic and treatment tool for gastro-intestinal disorders.

  • RUBBERIZED HIGHWAYS, ROOFING COOL URBAN HEAT ISLANDS IN ARIZONA

    RUBBERIZED HIGHWAYS, ROOFING COOL URBAN HEAT ISLANDS IN ARIZONA

    Fulton Schools Professor Kamil Kaloush’s work on “smart” materials helped lead to development of the rubberized pavements and coatings that continue to be among the most effective materials for lessening the unwanted impacts of our expanding urban heat islands.

  • REBUILDING AFTER DISASTERS: 5 ESSENTIAL READS

    REBUILDING AFTER DISASTERS: 5 ESSENTIAL READS

    The technologies and climate conditions of the 20th century aren’t reliable guides on which to base designs for new infrastructure, which will need to be more resilient to handle the impacts of climate change we’ll see in coming decades, say Fulton Schools Associate Professor Mikhail Chester and School for the Future of Innovation in Society Assistant Professor Thaddeus Miller.

  • USING OUTER SPACE TO HELP COOL BUILDINGS ON EARTH

    USING OUTER SPACE TO HELP COOL BUILDINGS ON EARTH

    Researchers are using a natural phenomenon called radiative sky cooling to develop roof panels that could reduce the energy needed to cool homes and other buildings. The technique might influence how buildings are constructed or retrofitted to be more energy efficient. It may also significantly help to advance a growing “zero-energy design” movement, says Fulton Schools Assistant Professor Nathan Johnson, who directs the Laboratory for Energy and Power Solutions.

September

2017
  • PHOENIX IS TRANSFORMING FROM A CALL CENTER HUB TO A TECH HOTBED

    PHOENIX IS TRANSFORMING FROM A CALL CENTER HUB TO A TECH HOTBED

    The Ira A. Fulton Schools of Engineering is cited as one of the main sources of a “deep pool” of talent that is moving the Phoenix area toward becoming one of the next big growth centers for technology industries. Tech startups, small businesses and corporations are finding prospective employees and partners among graduates of the Fulton Schools and other schools in the region.

  • SLEEK, NEW AND JUST FOR ENGINEERING STUDENTS

    SLEEK, NEW AND JUST FOR ENGINEERING STUDENTS

    The Tooker House, the Fulton Schools’ new student residential complex, made especially for engineering students, continues to draw interest from those who follow trends and innovations in campus living. Equipped with features such as Bluetooth-enabled laundry rooms, work spaces with 3D printers, laser cutters and other tools, and Amazon’s Echo Dot voice-recognition technology, the project is seen as a leading example of how to design buildings to function as “learning communities.”   

    Read More

    NEW ASU DORM FEATURES TECH TO CREATE ‘ENGINEERING MINDSET,’ CRONKITE NEWS

  • EVAPORATING LAKES COULD HELP POWER THE COUNTRY

    EVAPORATING LAKES COULD HELP POWER THE COUNTRY

    Artificial trees developed by Fulton Schools Professor Klaus Lackner can capture and remove carbon dioxide from the air, in part by harnessing the power of evaporation. That same principle is the basis for a method being proposed by other engineers and scientists for generating a renewable source of energy from the natural evaporation from lakes and reservoirs.

    Read More

    Energy Harvested from Evaporation Could Power Much of U.S., Laboratory Equipment

    Evaporation Technology Could Effectively Harness Energy from Renewable Sources, AZO Clean Tech

  • CIRCLING BACK TO IMPROVED SAFETY WITH ROUNDABOUTS IN SCOTTSDALE

    CIRCLING BACK TO IMPROVED SAFETY WITH ROUNDABOUTS IN SCOTTSDALE

    Recent research by Fulton Schools Professor Michael Mamlouk is cited in an article looking at the evidence on the impact of roadway roundabouts (also called traffic circles) on traffic flow and safety. The report — like Mamlouk’s research results — points out that despite some resistance to roundabouts, in most cases they have a positive effect not only on safety but on traffic efficiency, the environment and wear and tear on vehicles.

  • ASU PROJECT PUTS EDUCATIONAL LEARNING LIBRARIES IN COUNTRIES WHERE INTERNET IS SCARCE

    ASU PROJECT PUTS EDUCATIONAL LEARNING LIBRARIES IN COUNTRIES WHERE INTERNET IS SCARCE

    A solar-powered digital device developed by Assistant Professor Laura Hosman is the core technology driving a project that has won support through an international education innovation award. Hosman’s team is partnering with the U.S. Peace Corps to bring access to a digital library through the device called SolarSPELL to remote communities where educational resources are scarce. Hosman has a joint appointment in the Fulton Schools of Engineering and ASU’s School for the Future of Innovation in Society.

     

  • HOW WORRIED SHOULD WE BE ABOUT ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE?

    HOW WORRIED SHOULD WE BE ABOUT ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE?

    AI is both terrifying and exciting. There is no doubt that as AI continues to improve it will radically change the way we live. That can provide improvements, like self-driving cars, and doing many jobs that could in principle release humans to pursue more fulfilling activities. Or it could produce massive unemployment, and provide new vulnerabilities to hacking. Sophisticated cyber-hacking could undermine the reliability of information we receive everyday on the internet, and weaken national and international infrastructures.

    Nevertheless, fortune favors the prepared mind, so it is important to explore all the possibilities, both good and bad, now, to help us be better prepared for a future that will arrive whether we like it or not. — Lawrence Krauss, director, Origins Project and Fulton Engineering professor, ASU

  • DECODING THE BRAIN TO CONTROL A SWARM OF DRONES

    DECODING THE BRAIN TO CONTROL A SWARM OF DRONES

    One of major sources of news in the unmanned aerial vehicle field talked to Fulton Schools Associate Professor Panagiotis Artemiadis about the potential for advances in UAV technology to transform entire industries. Brain-machine interface and human systems integration are two of the areas that will be big game changers.

  • HOW ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE, ROBOTICS COULD TRANSFORM JOBS IN 10 YEARS

    HOW ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE, ROBOTICS COULD TRANSFORM JOBS IN 10 YEARS

    Fulton Schools Assistant Professor talks about how developing robots and artificial intelligence systems that can collaborate with humans on a variety of tasks may eliminate some jobs but also create new ones. Jobs involving application of knowledge in science, technology, engineering and math should be among those that will benefit from the human-technology interaction trend.

  • FDA ANTIMICROBIAL BAN LEAVES MANY PRODUCTS UNCHANGED

    FDA ANTIMICROBIAL BAN LEAVES MANY PRODUCTS UNCHANGED

    Recent restrictions imposed on the use of two chemicals that have been used for decades in antibacterial soaps and cosmetics still fail to stop their use in other products. Fulton Schools Professor Rolf Halden, who led research that led to the restrictions, reveals where consumers will still face exposure to the troublesome chemicals.

August

2017

July

2017
  • U.S. Department Of Defense Brain Study Seeks To Boost Learning In Soldiers

    U.S. Department Of Defense Brain Study Seeks To Boost Learning In Soldiers

    Advances in neuroengineering are creating possibilities for enhancing human learning abilities and cognitive performance. Fulton Schools Associate Professors Stephen Helms Tillery and Chris Buneo explain the “targeted” neuroplasticity research they are conducting with other ASU faculty members to help the U.S. Department of Defense provide more effective training for the nation’s soldiers.

  • 4 SCIENCE-BACKED HEALTH BENEFITS OF EATING ORGANIC

    4 SCIENCE-BACKED HEALTH BENEFITS OF EATING ORGANIC

    With the organic food market booming, consumers should be equipped with the facts about what organic actually means and doesn’t mean, and what benefits or risks may be involved in producing and consuming organic products. Fulton Schools Professor Rolf Halden, director of the Center for Environmental Security, says even people adhering to strict organic food diets need broader knowledge about nutrition and health to make wiser food choices.

  • WHAT ARE URBAN HEAT ISLANDS?

    WHAT ARE URBAN HEAT ISLANDS?

    Growing cities must become more aware of the factors that create “urban heat islands” and causes them to intensify. Kamil Kaloush, Fulton Schools associate professor of civil, environmental and sustainable engineering, and director of the National Center of Excellence for SMART Innovations, says making smarter choices about what materials to use in the construction of buildings, roads, parking lots and other civic infrastructure is critical in preventing a rise in ambient heat that makes urban environments not only less comfortable but also less sustainable.

  • BUILDING PROS SHARE JOB SKILLS WITH GILA RIVER STUDENTS

    BUILDING PROS SHARE JOB SKILLS WITH GILA RIVER STUDENTS

    The School of Sustainable Engineering the Built Environment, one of the six Fulton Schools, teamed up with a major Southwest construction contracting company to give young students from the Gila River Indian Community hands-on lessons in construction and engineering skills, and critical thinking.

  • WHERE THERE’S A WILL, IS THERE A WALL? BUILDING TRUMP’S BORDER WALL WON’T BE CHEAP

    WHERE THERE’S A WILL, IS THERE A WALL? BUILDING TRUMP’S BORDER WALL WON’T BE CHEAP

    The massive wall that President Donald Trump proposes to build along the United State-Mexico border would entail more than a significant cost, but also big energy use, environmental safety and construction logistics challenges. Barzin Mobasher, Fulton Schools professor of civil, environmental and sustainable engineering, points to some of the difficulties that could be encountered in developing the infrastructure and obtaining the resources to support the project.

    Also See:

    Mobasher is quoted in a July 21 Cronkite News report ‘Structurally deficient’ bridge over I-17 repaired using new technology

  • TO AVOID CLIMATE CATASTROPHE, WE’LL NEED TO REMOVE CO2 FROM THE AIR. HERE’S HOW

    TO AVOID CLIMATE CATASTROPHE, WE’LL NEED TO REMOVE CO2 FROM THE AIR. HERE’S HOW

    One of the more promising systems to stem the negative impacts of climate change by capturing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere is being developed by the research team of physicist Klaus Lackner, Fulton Schools professor of civil, environmental and sustainable engineering and director of ASU’s Center for Negative Carbon Emissions. Lacker tells Ensia, a magazine focusing on solutions to environmental challenges, that such a system theoretically could remove CO2 from the air many times more efficiently than plants.

  • SUN DEVILS AND SOLAR ENERGY: ASU RESEARCHERS AWARDED MORE THAN $4 MILLION TO DEVELOP SOLAR ENERGY SOLUTIONS

    SUN DEVILS AND SOLAR ENERGY: ASU RESEARCHERS AWARDED MORE THAN $4 MILLION TO DEVELOP SOLAR ENERGY SOLUTIONS

    Fulton Schools faculty members Mariana Bertoni, Stuart Bowden, Owen Hildreth, Govindasamy Tamizhmani  and Meng Tao are among researchers whose projects to develop innovative and affordable solar power technologies won support from the U.S. Department of Energy SunShot Initiative program — giving ASU more of these research awards than any other university.

  • A.I. SCIENTISTS TO ELON MUSK: STOP SAYING ROBOTS WILL KILL US ALL

    A.I. SCIENTISTS TO ELON MUSK: STOP SAYING ROBOTS WILL KILL US ALL

    Fulton Schools Professor Subbarao Kambhampati, president of the Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence, joined other experts in the field who say prominent inventor and entrepreneur Elon Musk is spreading an overly alarmist message about supposed threats that could someday be posed by advanced AI technology.

    Also See:

    AI Researchers Disagree With Elon Musk’s Warnings About Artificial Intelligence, Futurism, July 19

    Artificial Intelligence Experts Rebut Elon Musk’s Warning and Call for Regulation, The Christian Post, July 20

    Elon Musk SLAMMED by top researchers for scaremongering over dangers of AI, Express (United Kingdom), July 20

  • SCIENTISTS ARE SCRUTINIZING CITY SEWAGE TO STUDY OUR HEALTH

    SCIENTISTS ARE SCRUTINIZING CITY SEWAGE TO STUDY OUR HEALTH

    What’s flowing into wastewater treatments plants can reveal a treasure trove of information about our health and the health of our environment, says Fulton Schools Professor Rolf Halden. Those findings could help us prevent diseases, pinpoint environmental hazards and track our exposure to chemicals that might be harmful.

    Also See:

    Studying Wastewater Could Be Messy, But it May Improve Public Health, KJZZ (NPR), July 19

June

2017

May

2017
  • REPAIRING INFRASTRUCTURE FROM THE GROUND UP

    REPAIRING INFRASTRUCTURE FROM THE GROUND UP

    Fulton Schools Professor Samuel Ariaratnam was interviewed on a popular weekly podcast that probes into the intertwined subjects of emerging technologies, the Internet of Things and other facets of “the digital life.” Ariaratnam, chair of the construction engineering program, talked about what today’s “smart” cities must do to get even smarter about the use of advanced technologies for rehabilitating their urban infrastructures.

  • ROBOTIC TURTLES CAN BE USED TO DETECT LANDMINES IN THE DESERT

    ROBOTIC TURTLES CAN BE USED TO DETECT LANDMINES IN THE DESERT

    One of the latest and most inventive efforts springing for Heni Ben Amor’s expertise in robot-learning algorithms are small machines whose design is based on sea turtle anatomy and mobility style. The Fulton Schools assistant professor’s “turtle bots,” made from motors, computer chips and cardboard folded in origami style, are being tested on Arizona’s desert terrain to see how they would perform as battlefield landmine detectors.

    Also See:

    ASU Robotics turns to nature for inspiration, CBS 5 News Phoenix, June 5

    An Army of these odd-looking robotics ‘turtles’ might help rid the world of landmines, Digital Trends, May 27

    These flat-pack turtlebots will crawl across minefields for safety’s sake, TechCrunch, May 25

    These robotic turtles could save your life, New York Post, May 25

  • ARIZONA STATE UNIVERSITY STUDENTS, ADOT TEAM UP TO CREATE NEW TYPE OF CATTLE GUARD

    ARIZONA STATE UNIVERSITY STUDENTS, ADOT TEAM UP TO CREATE NEW TYPE OF CATTLE GUARD

    A senior-year engineering capstone design project led four recent Fulton Schools graduates to a collaboration with the Arizona Department of Transportation Research Center. The result is a prototype for a new kind of cattle guard using ultrasonic sensors and decoy predator sounds to prevent the grazing animals from stepping into the path of vehicles. Project team members Kevin Davidson and Marissa Rubio recently received degrees in mechanical engineering systems. Hanqing Chen graduated with an electrical systems engineering degree. Zhemin Ne earned a degree in auto systems engineering.

    Also See:
    ADOT enlists ASU engineering majors to help create new cattle guard concept, ADOT Blog, May 11

  • ARIZONA TEAM ONE OF TWO DOZEN WORKING TO MAKE HYPERLOOP TRAVEL POSSIBLE

    ARIZONA TEAM ONE OF TWO DOZEN WORKING TO MAKE HYPERLOOP TRAVEL POSSIBLE

    A multi-university team led by Fulton Schools students is preparing to move from the design stage to prototype testing this summer as it develops a high-speed terrestrial transport pod for the international SpaceX Hyperloop challenge. The team is one of 24 that has made it to the final round of the competition. Mechanical engineering grad student Lynne Nethken (pictured) was interviewed about the AZLoop project.

  • ARIZONA STATE UNIVERSITY STUDENTS FINISH $80,000 MOBILE DENTAL CLINIC FOR CHARITY

    ARIZONA STATE UNIVERSITY STUDENTS FINISH $80,000 MOBILE DENTAL CLINIC FOR CHARITY

    Engineering Smiles, a student endeavor that began several years ago in a Fulton Schools Engineering Projects in Community Service course, is realizing its goal of providing a mobile dental clinic to underserved communities. Among the project’s leaders (pictured at right) are Sara Mantlik , who just received a master’s degree in mechanical engineering, and Nick Kemme, who is pursuing a similar degree.

  • HOW RUSSIA’S HACKING AND INFLUENCE OPS HELP PUTIN

    HOW RUSSIA’S HACKING AND INFLUENCE OPS HELP PUTIN

    Fulton Schools Professor Brad Allenby comments about the hacking attack on one of the candidates in the French presidential election, speculating on the identity of the perpetrators of the hacking and their political motives. Allenby co-directs ASU’s Weaponized Narrative Initiative, which focuses on examining the uses of technology in misinformation campaigns calculated to influence public perception. Public Radio International’s “The World” is broadcast on more than 300 stations across North America. Read more about the study of weaponized narrative.

April

2017
  • HOW TO KEEP CLOTHES FROM SMELLING BAD

    HOW TO KEEP CLOTHES FROM SMELLING BAD

    When people exercise, their bodies sweat and their clothes get wet. And that means their clothes, like their bodies, can smell.

    Paul Westerhoff is a professor of Environmental Engineering at Arizona State University. He researched the effectiveness of silver in clothes to kill bacteria and how it impacts the environment. The study was published in Environmental Science & Technology last year.

  • ROBOTS TAUGHT TO WORK ALONGSIDE HUMANS BY GIVING HIGH FIVES

    ROBOTS TAUGHT TO WORK ALONGSIDE HUMANS BY GIVING HIGH FIVES

    Heni Ben Amor, an assistance professor who specializes in advanced robotics and artificial intelligence at ASU, says that having robots learn from watching humans interact won’t just make them better collaborators, it will help humans feel more at ease around robots too. “There’s a high demand for robots that are socially aware,” he says.

    If robots can learn the basics of social interaction, like knowing how fast to move their arms or how close to stand to a person without making them feel uncomfortable, then humans are much more likely to accept robots in their home or workplace, he says.

  • VALLEY METRO CEO: FEDERAL CUTS THREATEN LIGHT RAIL, TROLLEY PROJECTS

    VALLEY METRO CEO: FEDERAL CUTS THREATEN LIGHT RAIL, TROLLEY PROJECTS

    Fulton Schools Professor Ram Pendyala, whose expertise is in transportation systems engineering and planning, comments on the potential benefits of public transportation systems and on the costs-versus-benefits aspect of the debate over government funding of mass transit projects.

  • DARPA TO USE ELECTRICAL STIMULATION TO ENHANCE MILITARY TRAINING

    DARPA TO USE ELECTRICAL STIMULATION TO ENHANCE MILITARY TRAINING

    Fulton Schools Associate Professor Stephen Helms Tillery is leading a research group that has a key role in a Department of Defense agency’s project to expand human learning capability. His team will develop techniques to stimulate specific nerve complexes in the brain with the goal of enhancing its neuroplasticity to improve mental abilities. Read more about the overall project on the Gizmodo technology and science news site.

    Also See:

  • SILICON VALLEY HIRES THE MOST ALUMNI OF THESE 10 UNIVERSITIES, AND NONE OF THEM ARE IN THE IVY LEAGUE

    SILICON VALLEY HIRES THE MOST ALUMNI OF THESE 10 UNIVERSITIES, AND NONE OF THEM ARE IN THE IVY LEAGUE

    The most coveted jobs are in Silicon Valley, and most selective US universities are members of the Ivy League. So it stands to reason that tech giants like Apple, Google, Amazon and Facebook would scoop up best and brightest from those bastions of power and privilege.

    Arizona State University ranks among the top 10 schools with the most undergraduate and graduate alumni hired by the 25 biggest Silicon Valley employers in the last year, ranking ahead of Cornell, Purdue and MIT.

  • MAKING THE RIGHT PICK: HOW ARIZONA COLLEGES ARE STEPPING IN TO TEACH GRADS THE SKILLS COMPANIES NEED IN NEW HIRES

    MAKING THE RIGHT PICK: HOW ARIZONA COLLEGES ARE STEPPING IN TO TEACH GRADS THE SKILLS COMPANIES NEED IN NEW HIRES

    Starbucks’ relationship with Arizona State University, where Starbucks’ employees can earn their bachelor’s degree through ASU’s online program, is an example of bringing students to the curriculum rather than the campus.

    Last year, Ford Motor Co. designated ASU as a premier school and a top-tier Ford recruiting and hiring institution, which means Ford considers ASU a go-to place to recruit graduates.

    “Ford is a perfect example of a greater relationship that we have with a lot of organizations,” said Cindy Parnell, executive director at ASU’s Career and Professional Development Services.

    Another program is the Startup Center in the Ira A. Fulton Schools of Engineering, which offers classes, workshops, mentoring, investment and extracurricular activities that expose students to the concepts of entrepreneurship and technology innovation.

  • ROBOTIC SUIT SPEEDS UP WALKING SPEED

    ROBOTIC SUIT SPEEDS UP WALKING SPEED

    ASU Engineering Professor Tom Sugar has developed a robotic suit meant to help people walk faster and avoid workplace injuries.  The suit propels users forward 10 to 15 percent faster than normal, supporting legs to move faster and more smoothly.

    The exoskeleton was one of the many devices demonstrate during WeRACon 17 in Phoenix last month. 

  • PROFESSOR, COMPANY WORKING ON TECH FOR RETINA TO HELP BLIND

    PROFESSOR, COMPANY WORKING ON TECH FOR RETINA TO HELP BLIND

    According to the World Health Organization, 285 million people worldwide are visually impaired. Thirty-nine million are blind, while 246 million have low vision. 

    Bradley Greger, an associate professor at ASU, is partnering with a California-based company called Second Sight on technology that can be placed on the retina to provide a limited amount of vision to blind people. He’s also working on a brain implant that will provide some vision for the blind. He’s with me to talk about it.

  • RESEARCHERS TREAT AMPUTEES BY STIMULATING NERVES IN FDA TRIAL

    RESEARCHERS TREAT AMPUTEES BY STIMULATING NERVES IN FDA TRIAL

    Fulton Schools Associate Professor James Abbas is collaborating with researchers at Florida International University to make advances in bioelectronics medicine and prosthetics technologies that could restore a sense of touch for amputees.

  • ASU LAB HOME TO LARGEST WASTE REPOSITORY IN U.S.

    ASU LAB HOME TO LARGEST WASTE REPOSITORY IN U.S.

    Many valuable questions about public health can be answered by analyzing samples from sewage sludge, says Fulton Schools Professor Rolf Halden, director of the Center for Environmental Security. His lab stores a large collection of the revealing material.

March

2017
  • ASU STUDENT MAY KNOW HOW TO CREATE LIFE ON THE MOON

    ASU STUDENT MAY KNOW HOW TO CREATE LIFE ON THE MOON

    Fulton Schools computer systems engineering student Autumn Conner has an idea for sending a small capsule containing a kind of bacteria to the moon, where it could create photosynthesis. A startup venture based in India has selected her idea for funding.

  • STRIPPING CARBON DIOXIDE FROM THE ATMOSPHERE

    STRIPPING CARBON DIOXIDE FROM THE ATMOSPHERE

    Researchers in the Center for Negative Carbon Emissions led by Fulton Schools Professor Klaus Lackner are developing technologies that promise to enable removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. In an interview on Australian national radio, Lackner said carbon-capture systems may be the most effective option for keeping the buildup of this greenhouse gas from rising to levels at which it would pose a critical threat to the health of Earth’s environment.  

  • 3D PRINTING PROSTHETICS PART 1: WAYS TO GET INVOLVED

    3D PRINTING PROSTHETICS PART 1: WAYS TO GET INVOLVED

    A group of ASU materials science engineers, Jason Enriquez, Tayler Fulton, Nicholas Lauer and Brian Zucker, dedicated its Capstone project to improving existing 3D printing open source designs. By connecting through their professors with local companies in the additive manufacturing field, the students are identifying better materials and how to 3D print with them for this purpose. The end goal is to improve on current open-source transhumeral (upper arm) prostheses; additional guidance is being offered by Justin Ryan, the lead research scientist at the Cardiac 3D Print Lab, Phoenix Children’s Hospital.

  • ARIZONA STUDENTS’ TEAM TO COMPETE IN SPACEX HYPERLOOP COMPETITION

    ARIZONA STUDENTS’ TEAM TO COMPETE IN SPACEX HYPERLOOP COMPETITION

    Arizona’s Hyperloop team, led by ASU engineering master’s student Lynne Nethken and senior Josh Kosar, say the Space X competition is just a first step to bringing high speed, mass transportation to Arizona and beyond.

    If chosen to continue in the competition, the team will get to launch its prototype pod in the one-mile test track this summer in Hawthorne, California.

    The Hyperloop is a proposed form of high-speed mass transportation that can achieve speeds of up to 750 miles per hour.

  • IT’S TIME FOR US GEEKS TO STAND UP AND BE HEARD

    IT’S TIME FOR US GEEKS TO STAND UP AND BE HEARD

    Computer scientists are often left out of public debate on issues that involve computer science, and that’s a potentially serious mistake when the goal is to improve cybersecurity, says Fulton Schools Professor of Practice Nayda Bliss, director of Arizona State University’s Global Security Initiative. For the sake of making cyberspace safer for all of us, computer geeks must no longer let themselves be ignored, she says.

  • PUBLIC-PRIVATE ’MARRIAGE’ TO DRIVE STEM GROWTH

    PUBLIC-PRIVATE ’MARRIAGE’ TO DRIVE STEM GROWTH

    “University and industry are like darlings, always praising each other, but we need to ‘get married’ already, and be fully committed to helping each other, compensating for each other’s weaknesses,” said Nguyen Thanh Nam, former CEO of FPT and founder of online university FUNIX, at a conference on science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) education and in the workforce.

    The conference, held this year in Hanoi, was organized by the ASU’s Higher Engineering Education Alliance Program (HEEAP).

  • SPECTACULAR ENGINEERING FILM INSPIRES KIDS TO DREAM BIG

    SPECTACULAR ENGINEERING FILM INSPIRES KIDS TO DREAM BIG

    Angelica Hernandez, 2011 ASU Distinguished Grad in Mechanical Engineering, is featured in “Dream Big: Our Engineering World,” a documentary created to promote education in STEM. Hernandez, who went on to earn her master’s at Stanford, was a member of the Phoenix high school team that beat 2004 MIT in 2004.

    The documentary is airing at the Arizona Science Center’s Irene P. Flinn Theater as follows:

    March 3-12

    • 9:30 a.m.
    • 10:30 a.m. (except Saturday, March 11)
    • 12:30 p.m.
    • 2:30 p.m.
    • 4:30pm (except March 3-9)

    March 13-31:

    • 9:30 a.m.
    • 4:30 p.m. 
  • OUR BOTS, OURSELVES

    OUR BOTS, OURSELVES

    The future may be a world in which we live with artificial intelligence “agents” that speak to us in human voices and understand our thoughts and feelings on a deep level. Futurists foresee people partnering with lifelong “digital assistants” or “virtual companions” that guide us through life, and which might eventually take the form of brain implants. Experts such as Fulton Schools Professor Subbarao Kambhampati, president of the Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence, comment on some of the benefits and possible risks of such potential developments.

February

2017
  • ASU GRAD, MIAO HE, HONORED FOR WIND TURBINE RESEARCH

    ASU GRAD, MIAO HE, HONORED FOR WIND TURBINE RESEARCH

    Miao He’s work with enhancing the efficiency of wind turbine farms in the face of disruptive weather has earned him a prestigious grant from the National Science Foundation that recognizes the work of up-and-coming faculty.  

    He, an assistant professor in the Texas Tech University Whitacre College of Engineering, has been selected to receive an award from the Faculty Early Career Development Program.  He received his MS in Physics in 2010 and his Ph.D. in Industrial Engineering in 2013, both from ASU.

  • COMPUTER HACKS OF THE FUTURE, AND HOW TO PREVENT THEM

    COMPUTER HACKS OF THE FUTURE, AND HOW TO PREVENT THEM

    The wave of artificial intelligence technology coming at us carries with it the upside of enhancing our lives with things like self-driving cars, as well as the potential downside of threats posed by malicious hacking of the computerized devices and systems we rely on. The situation is discussed by three AI experts, including Subbarao Kamhampati, a Fulton Schools professor of computer science and engineering and president of the Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence. Each of them participated in a three-day Challenges of Artificial Intelligence Workshop at Arizona State University. Illustration: Shutterstock

  • ENGINEERS DEVELOP DNA LIGHT SWITCH

    ENGINEERS DEVELOP DNA LIGHT SWITCH

    DNA, the stuff of life, may very well also pack quite the jolt for engineers trying to advance the development of tiny, low-cost electronic devices.

    Much like flipping a light switch at home—only on a scale 1,000 times smaller than a human hair—a team of researchers has now developed the first controllable DNA switch to regulate the flow of electricity within a single, atomic-sized molecule. The new study, led by  Fulton Schools ECEE professor and director of the Biodesign Institute’s Bioelectronics and Biosensors Nongjian Tao, is published in the online journal Nature Communications.

  • ASU MAKING STRIDES ON EARLY TEST FOR PANCREATIC CANCER

    ASU MAKING STRIDES ON EARLY TEST FOR PANCREATIC CANCER

    Fulton School of Biological Health Systems Engineering Assistant Professor Tony Hu and rand his team at the Biodesign Institute are working on a new test to catch pancreatic cancer in its earliest stages.

    If caught early enough, pancreatic cancer can be controlled, but the sneaky disease develops aggressively and doesn’t usually show any obvious signs in the early stages.

    Because pancreatic cancer is usually caught in the late stages, an estimated 80 percent die within a year of diagnosis, according to the American Cancer Society.

    But Hu’s team has discovered a new method to identify pancreatic cancer in its early development.

  • THIS SIX-LEGGED ROBOT WALKS MORE EFFICIENTLY THAN AN INSECT

    THIS SIX-LEGGED ROBOT WALKS MORE EFFICIENTLY THAN AN INSECT

    Engineers and scientists have long been mimicking nature to find solutions, but some are now making technological advances by improving on nature. Fulton Schools Assistant Professor Ted Pavlic, whose work combines engineering with knowledge of insect behavior, comments on news of the recent achievement of scientists who made a robot that improves on an insect mobility method.

  • COULD PRESIDENT TRUMP TAKE US BACK TO THE MOON?

    COULD PRESIDENT TRUMP TAKE US BACK TO THE MOON?

    President Trump has said he wants to “unlock the mysteries of space” and “focus on stretching the envelope of space exploration.”

    Dr. Scott Parazynski, a retired astronaut and a professor of practice at both ASU’s Schools of Biological Health and Systems Engineering and Earth and Space Exploration called the crewed mission idea an “audacious challenge.”

    “If you have a crew on board, the complexity of the mission increases substantially,” he told NBC News. “You are committing to making it a perfect round trip. You need to have the life support systems, the launch abort system and the recovery systems built into the vehicle the first time around.”

  • ARIZONA STATE UNIVERSITY INCORPORATES BUSINESS START-UP SKILLS INTO ENGINEERING SCHOOLS

    ARIZONA STATE UNIVERSITY INCORPORATES BUSINESS START-UP SKILLS INTO ENGINEERING SCHOOLS

    Arizona State University has designed its engineering schools to not only teach engineering, but also to develop entrepreneurs. In addition to the traditional classroom education, students are given the space and the skills to invent, design, produce, and market what their minds conceive. 

    “The entrepreneurial mindset has become more prevalent in today’s students than ever before,” says Richard Martorano, director of facilities and space renovations for the Ira A. Fulton Schools of Engineering at ASU. “They see the engineers and inventors who have become household names and want to emulate them.”

  • ELON MUSK SAYS HUMANS MUST BECOME CYBORGS TO STAY RELEVANT. IS HE RIGHT?

    ELON MUSK SAYS HUMANS MUST BECOME CYBORGS TO STAY RELEVANT. IS HE RIGHT?

    ASU’s Panagiotis Artemiadis says “no.”

    Artemiadis has been trying to get more bandwidth using a 128-electrode EEG cap to allow a human to control a swarm of flying robots with their brain. “We can already decode basic concepts like closing a hand or moving an elbow, but we can’t decode more complex behaviors,” he said.

    He has created a system that allows for a single person to control the collaborative movement of multiple drones, for example making the flock move closer together so that it can fit through a narrow pass.

    He is skeptical that the rise of AI will render humans irrelevant.

    “We are building these machines to serve humans,” he said.

  • TEAM OF ARIZONA STATE UNIVERSITY STUDENTS WORK TO IMPROVE ACCESS TO CLEAN DRINKING WATER IN UNDERDEVELOPED COUNTRIES

    TEAM OF ARIZONA STATE UNIVERSITY STUDENTS WORK TO IMPROVE ACCESS TO CLEAN DRINKING WATER IN UNDERDEVELOPED COUNTRIES

    A project supported by students at Arizona State University is working in underdeveloped countries to improve their access to clean drinking water.

    Five ASU students — Pankti Shah, Paul Strong, Varendra Silva, Mark Huerta and Connor Wiegand — have joined the project, 33 Buckets, in the hopes of making a positive impact and addressing water crises around the globe.

  • MY TURN: ARTS EDUCATION PAVED THE WAY FOR GIRLS’ ROBOTICS WIN

    MY TURN: ARTS EDUCATION PAVED THE WAY FOR GIRLS’ ROBOTICS WIN

    It should be no surprise that a team of girls from an arts schools earned top awards at the recent Arizona FIRST LEGO League championship tournament, says the head of the Arizona School for the Arts. The competition managed by Arizona State University’s Ira A. Fulton Schools of Engineering focuses on robotics and research. The school’s CEO says the team’s success goes to show how arts education fosters creativity, critical thinking and problem-solving skills that translate into talent in taking on the challenges of engineering and science.

January

2017
  • ASA ALL-GIRLS ROBOTICS TEAM WINS STATEWIDE COMPETITION

    ASA ALL-GIRLS ROBOTICS TEAM WINS STATEWIDE COMPETITION

    A team of seven Fifth through Eighth grade robotics students was recently named one of two winning teams selected to head to the FIRST LEGO League World Festival in Houston, Texas on April 19.

    The all-girls team of arts students from downtown Phoenix charter school Arizona School for the Arts (ASA) competed against 96 teams in the Arizona State FIRST LEGO League Challenge hosted by the Ira A. Fulton School of Engineering on Jan. 14-15. The competition encourages youth to think like scientists and engineers through problem-solving and teamwork.

  • SEE INSIDE THE SOUTHWEST’S LARGEST 3D PRINTING RESEARCH FACILITY AT ASU

    SEE INSIDE THE SOUTHWEST’S LARGEST 3D PRINTING RESEARCH FACILITY AT ASU

    The Southwest’s largest 3D printing research facility has opened at the Polytechnic School at Arizona State University’s Additive Manufacturing Research Center in Mesa.

    The 15,000-square-foot addition, holding $2.5 million of plastic, polymer and 3D metal printing equipment, will be used for a variety of research and development activities with students.

    Also see:  Arizona State University, businesses team up for Manufacturing Research and Innovation Hub, Arizona Business Daily, Jan. 30

  • CLEANING THE AIR WITH PLASTIC [EXCERPT]

    CLEANING THE AIR WITH PLASTIC [EXCERPT]

    Scientists and engineers are trying inventions such as artificial trees to pull carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere

    An excerpt from David Biello’s book, The Unnatural World: The Race to Remake Civilization in Earth’s Newest Age, features the work of Klaus Lackner and his team at Arizona State University’s Fulton Schools of Engineering. 

    An artificial tree on the Tempe campus — thin strips of beige, wavy plastic stacked one atop another in a clear box hidden from the desert sun by a piece of plywood covered in a black cloth — can suck CO2 out of the air.

  • NEW AUTISM TREATMENT COULD COME FROM ALTERING GUT MICROBIOTA

    NEW AUTISM TREATMENT COULD COME FROM ALTERING GUT MICROBIOTA

    Getting to the guts of the matter for autism is exactly what a group of investigators, led by scientists at Arizona State University (ASU), hopes to accomplish with its novel approach to effective autism treatments by focusing on improving the gut microbiome through fecal microbial transplants. While initial results from a small human study are promising, additional testing will be necessary before an FDA-approved therapy would be available or recommended to the public. The research team was led by ASU’s James Adams, a professor of materials science and engineering. The study results were published in the journal Microbiome.

    Also see:  

  • ASU SPINOUT GETS NATIONAL FUNDING FOR TISSUE CHIP

    ASU SPINOUT GETS NATIONAL FUNDING FOR TISSUE CHIP

    Mechanical engineering grad David Richardson has received funding for ASU spinout company bioSyntagma, developed while he was a research engineer at the Biodesign Institute. The company’s Light Stream FloCell™ allows researchers to understand how disease-causing cells interact with each other and may be able to answer questions relating to why cancers metastasize, which drugs are most effective for a patient at a given point in time, and what disease mechanisms are active in arthritis, diabetes, and dementia.

  • NEW ASU CENTER TO RESEARCH FUTURE OF TRANSPORTATION

    NEW ASU CENTER TO RESEARCH FUTURE OF TRANSPORTATION

    Arizona State University has been named the lead institution for a new U.S. Department of Transportation Tier 1 University Transportation Center and will work with the U.S. Department of Transportation on improving regional and local transportation systems. The Center for Teaching Old Models New Tricks, or TOMNET, will work to improve data models and analytical tools used to plan transportation infrastructure, said SEBE Professor Ram Pendyala, the center’s director.

    “If we can find ways to successfully integrate these kinds of behavioral variables into our analytics, then I think we can make a quantum leap in our ability to predict future travel needs and desires,” Pendyala said

  • SOUTHWEST’S LARGEST ADDITIVE MANUFACTURING HUB FORMED AT ASU IN PARTNERSHIP WITH HONEYWELL AEROSPACE, PADT, CONCEPT LASER

    SOUTHWEST’S LARGEST ADDITIVE MANUFACTURING HUB FORMED AT ASU IN PARTNERSHIP WITH HONEYWELL AEROSPACE, PADT, CONCEPT LASER

    One of the ‘outstanding’ facilities is the Manufacturing Research and Innovation Hub, a 15,000-square-foot center containing a lab with over $2 million worth of polymer and plastic materials and 3D metal printing equipment. The university recently formed a partnership with Honeywell Aerospace, Phoenix Analysis & Design Technologies, Inc. (PADT), and Concept Laser to help build and make the new facility a reality.

    “If you go to school in Arizona and hope to pursue a manufacturing engineering undergraduate degree, the only place you can get one is ASU’s Polytechnic School.”

  • ZYGOTE JOURNAL INTERVIEW: KONRAD RYKACZEWSKI

    ZYGOTE JOURNAL INTERVIEW: KONRAD RYKACZEWSKI

    A recent special issue of the Zygote Journal, which focuses on biologically inspired science and design, features interviews with speakers at the first Biomimicry Summit and Education Forum for Aerospace. Among the them is Konrad Rykaczewski, Fulton Schools assistant professor of aerospace and mechanical engineering.

    In his interview, he talks about how the abilities of a poisonous dart frog led him to an idea for a de-icing method that could make flight safer, and how mimicking the natural mechanisms involved in the way water interacts with prickly pear cactus could provide a basis for some useful technological developments. He also has found a particularly effective way to wash pesky insects off of vegetables.

    Rykaczewski’s interview begins on page 96 of the digital magazine.You can download the issue, or enlarge it on your computer screen. Read more about Rykaczewski’s recent research at: http://intheloop.engineering.asu.edu/2017/01/30/turning-to-nano-engineering-to-fight-off-troublesome-frost-and-ice/

December

2016
  • DOES INTEL SERVE AS A MAGNET TO ATTRACT HI-TECH FIES?

    DOES INTEL SERVE AS A MAGNET TO ATTRACT HI-TECH FIES?

    Intel Products Vietnam plans to expand its factory in Ho Chi Minh City in 2017.

    According to Sherry Boger, CEO of IPV, the expanded factory will prepare large area for cleanrooms class 10. Intel has joined forces with VNPT Technology to set up a lab reserved for IoT research. 

    The Higher Engineering Education Alliance Program, a project initiated by Intel and supported by ASU and USAID, has trained over 5,000 lecturers and high-ranking managers for eight schools throughout the country in accordance with ABET standards. HEEAP will be a source of supply for the workforce at Intel and the IoT market as a whole.

  • DOES INTEL SERVE AS A MAGNET TO ATTRACT HI-TECH FIES?

    DOES INTEL SERVE AS A MAGNET TO ATTRACT HI-TECH FIES?

    Intel Products Vietnam plans to expand its factory in Ho Chi Minh City in 2017.

    According to Sherry Boger, CEO of IPV, the expanded factory will prepare large area for cleanrooms class 10. Intel has joined forces with VNPT Technology to set up a lab reserved for IoT research. 

    The Higher Engineering Education Alliance Program, a project initiated by Intel and supported by ASU and USAID, has trained over 5,000 lecturers and high-ranking managers for eight schools throughout the country in accordance with ABET standards. HEEAP will be a source of supply for the workforce at Intel and the IoT market as a whole.

  • THE SEARCH IS ON FOR PULLING CARBON FROM THE AIR

    THE SEARCH IS ON FOR PULLING CARBON FROM THE AIR

    Scientists are investigating a range of technologies they hope can capture lots of carbon without a lot of cost, but ASU’s Klaus Lackner, director of the Center for Negative Carbon Emissions, doubts one of the technologies can be sustained due to scale.

  • RESEARCHERS WORK ON DEVELOPMENT OF GAME-CHANGING NANOWIRE METAMATERIALS

    RESEARCHERS WORK ON DEVELOPMENT OF GAME-CHANGING NANOWIRE METAMATERIALS

    Mechanical engineer Liping Wang, an assistant professor at Arizona State University, imagines an energy sector enhanced by greater control over thermal radiation. To work toward this objective, he is designing and constructing a host of custom electromagnetic materials. Wang’s endeavor is supported by a Young Investigator Program research grant from the Air Force Office of Scientific Research, totaling $360,000 over three years. The program received more than 230 proposals, awarding grants to only 25 percent of applicants.

  • ASU TEAM DEVELOPING PARKINSON’S DEVICE WITH HELP FROM HIGH SCHOOLER

    ASU TEAM DEVELOPING PARKINSON’S DEVICE WITH HELP FROM HIGH SCHOOLER

    Among the researchers at ASU’s Center for Cognitive Ubiquitous Computing — or CUbiC — is one who doesn’t have a high school diploma. Yet.

    Shreya Venkatesh, a high school senior at BASIS Scottsdale, is helping program the device’s vibration patterns. That “vibrotactile feedback,” as CUbiC calls it, is designed to alert Parkinson’s patients that a freezing episode may be ahead and help them avoid it.    

  • SYNTHESIS OF PSEUDO-1D SEMICONDUCTOR PROVIDES INSIGHT INTO ANISOTROPIC 2D MATERIALS

    SYNTHESIS OF PSEUDO-1D SEMICONDUCTOR PROVIDES INSIGHT INTO ANISOTROPIC 2D MATERIALS

    For the first time, researchers have synthesized semiconducting gallium telluride (GaTe) in the monoclinic phase as a pseudo-one-dimensional (pseudo-1D) material. This new class of materials is characterized by quasi-1D chains of atoms running in a particular direction along a 2D surface. 

    The researchers, led by Sefaattin Tongay, Assistant Professor of Materials Science and Engineering at Arizona State University, have published a paper on the first synthesis of the pseudo-1D GaTe material in a recent issue of Advanced Materials.

  • VETERANS STARTING BUSINESSES IN PHOENIX GET A HELPING HAND

    VETERANS STARTING BUSINESSES IN PHOENIX GET A HELPING HAND

    Paulo Shakarian, a 2016 Fulton Entrepreneurial Professor and director of the Cyber-Socio Intelligent Systems Lab, has taken on the role of team leader for area veterans through the Armory Incubator. Shakarian, a West Point grad who served as a military intelligence officer, launched Cyr3con last year. The company focuses on cyber reconnaissance.

  • ISIGN INTERNATIONAL IS PROUD TO ANNOUNCE THAT DOCTOR ZIMING ZHAO HAS BEEN ACCEPTED TO BECOME A MEMBER OF ITS ADVISORY COMMITTEE

    ISIGN INTERNATIONAL IS PROUD TO ANNOUNCE THAT DOCTOR ZIMING ZHAO HAS BEEN ACCEPTED TO BECOME A MEMBER OF ITS ADVISORY COMMITTEE

    Ziming Zhao, an assistant research professor in the School of Computing, Informatics, and Decision Systems Engineering, Ira A. Fulton Schools of Engineering, Arizona State University, has been named a member of the iSign International Advisory Committee. Zhao’s focus is on security and privacy related problems in computer and communications systems.

    Commenting on the news, Gerard E. Munera , the Chairman of iSign, said, “Dr Zhao’s background, experience and intellectual capacities represent, without any doubt, a huge asset for our company.” Zhao joins ASU’s Gail-Joon Ahn on the iSign team.

  • HOW DO YOU EASE TRAFFIC IN LOS ANGELES? MAKE IT HARD TO PARK

    HOW DO YOU EASE TRAFFIC IN LOS ANGELES? MAKE IT HARD TO PARK

    A paradigm shift in our car-centric approach to urban development is what it will take to keep traffic congestion from clogging the roadways in our growing metropolitan areas. In this Op-Ed article, Fulton Schools Assistant Professor Mikhail Chester and civil engineering postdoctoral research associate Andrew Fraser help to propose ways to make that shift. They and Fulton Schools Professor Ram Pendyala are also among co-authors of articles on the same topic in ACCESS magazine and the Journal of the American Planning Association.

  • VERITAS GENETICS ADDS THREE SCIENTIFIC ADVISORY BOARD MEMBERS TO ACCELERATE PROGRESS AND DISCOVERY IN CONSUMER GENETICS

    VERITAS GENETICS ADDS THREE SCIENTIFIC ADVISORY BOARD MEMBERS TO ACCELERATE PROGRESS AND DISCOVERY IN CONSUMER GENETICS

    Scott Parazynski, M.D., former NASA Astronaut and Physiologist with expertise in human adaptation to extreme environments, CEO of Fluidity Technologies and prolific product developer, joins VeritasGenetics as a scientific advisory board member.

    Parazynski, an SBHSE professor, is one of three new advisory board members chosen for their complementary perspectives and expertise in the fields of biomedical informatics, physiology and molecular genetics.

  • WHAT WOULD HAPPEN IF THE EPA STOPPED WORKING ALTOGETHER?

    WHAT WOULD HAPPEN IF THE EPA STOPPED WORKING ALTOGETHER?

    Vice Staff Writer Mike Pearl had a conversation about what would happen if the EPA were disbanded with Brad Allenby, professor of civil and environmental engineering at Arizona State University and former senior environmental attorney for AT&T. Allenby said environmental protection is a whole lot more than just regulating of CO2 emissions, and that even hardcore capitalists can love some of what it does.

  • HOW TO MAKE SOLAR WORK

    HOW TO MAKE SOLAR WORK

    Fulton Schools Professor Meng Tao is working on ways to help society switch to more sustainable sources of energy through his research aimed at producing advances in solar energy technologies. He’s focusing on moving toward large-scale implementation of solar technology that could shift our energy dependence away from fossil fuels.

  • ASU PROF HELPS KIDS ENGINEER A PATH TO CAREERS OF THE FUTURE

    ASU PROF HELPS KIDS ENGINEER A PATH TO CAREERS OF THE FUTURE

    The Fulton Schools Engineering Projects in Community Service (EPICS) program is being adapted by Tirupalavanam Ganesh and Jennifer Velez to introduce middle school students to engineering careers. Ganesh is the Fulton Schools assistant dean of engineering education and an associate research professor. Velez is a senior coordinator for K-12 engineering education outreach.

November

2016
  • 2016’S STATES MOST VULNERABLE TO IDENTITY THEFT & FRAUD

    2016’S STATES MOST VULNERABLE TO IDENTITY THEFT & FRAUD

    According to the Identity Theft Resource Center’s most recent Data Breach Report, Arizona ranks 20th overall in terms of susceptibility to crimes ranging from “identity-theft complaints per capita” to “average loss amount due to fraud.” Gail-Joon Ahn, director of ASU’s Center for Cybersecurity and Digital Forensics, answers some questions about how to guard against identity theft.

  • GO BY YOUR EXPERIENCE

    GO BY YOUR EXPERIENCE

    In his latest article for a leading construction management and engineering industry magazine, retired Fulton Schools research professor Thomas C. Schleifer provides building contractors with a formula for assessing the potential financial risks and rewards of taking on projects outside of their specific areas of expertise and experience.

  • I GOT DUNKED ON BY A BASKETBALL-PLAYING ROBOT

    I GOT DUNKED ON BY A BASKETBALL-PLAYING ROBOT

    Motherboard’s Daniel Oberhaus loses 3-1 in a game of hoops against SunDevil RX, the self-learning, basketball shooting robot from Assistant Professor Heni Ben Amor’s Interactive Robotics Lab at ASU. Ben Amor reinforcement learning algorithm, called sparse latent space policy search, allows it to “learn by doing” and accurately shoot a basketball into a hoop. The machine learning algorithms developed for SunDevil RX will have value in manufacturing environments where speedy recalibration of tasks is required.

  • ASU SHOWCASES SUSTAINABLE PAVEMENT METHODS

    ASU SHOWCASES SUSTAINABLE PAVEMENT METHODS

    The 13th Annual Arizona Pavements/Materials Conference began Tuesday on Arizona State University’s Campus with demonstrations of six different types of sustainable pavement.

    The demonstrations took place on Orange Street and McAllister Avenue where folks from ASU, the Arizona Department of Transportation and the Federal Highway Administration showcased the sustainable pavement types.  The conference, which has more than 400 attendees, continues through Thursday, Nov. 17 and includes exhibitors from the construction and supply industries.

  • HOW POKÉMON GO CAN SAVE LIVES IN A HURRICANE

    HOW POKÉMON GO CAN SAVE LIVES IN A HURRICANE

    “What if, in response to crises, augmented and alternate reality games like Pokémon Go Switch into a mode that rewarded players for donating blood? Delivering water bottles? Filling sandbags? Offering temporary housing? Or evacuating areas threatened by storm, wildfires, floods, tornadoes, or other hazards?”

    The future of civic disaster response using gamification is the subject of an article by Thomas P. Seager, associate professor and Susan Spierre Clark, research assistant professor, both from the Fulton School of Sustainable Engineering and the Built Environment, originally written for Zocalo Public Square.

  • LOW-COST, MINIMALLY INVASIVE PIEZOELECTRIC MEMS SENSOR MONITORS CRITICAL BRAIN PRESSURE

    LOW-COST, MINIMALLY INVASIVE PIEZOELECTRIC MEMS SENSOR MONITORS CRITICAL BRAIN PRESSURE

    Elevated pressure inside the skull can be deadly if it is not identified and relieved quickly, leading to a shortage of oxygen and glucose to the rest of the body. Most solutions for monitoring are invasive and inaccurate.

    A collaborative team from ASU’s School of Electrical, Computer and Energy Engineering and the School of Biological and Health Systems Engineering, led by ECEE’s Jennifer Blain Christen, is working on a low-cost sensor that could be easily and cost-effectively used to help scientists and doctors understand epilepsy and detect seizure zones in the brain area that might lead to surgical treatment of the disease.

  • BACCALAUREATE PROGRAM IN GRAPHIC INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY AT ASU EARNS NATIONAL ACCGC ACCREDITATION

    BACCALAUREATE PROGRAM IN GRAPHIC INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY AT ASU EARNS NATIONAL ACCGC ACCREDITATION

    After completing an extensive self-study and hosting a site visit by a three-member team of industry and education experts, the Graphic Information Technology program at Arizona State University was awarded national accreditation beginning September 1, 2016.  

    The Arizona State University program is among 13, associate and baccalaureate level, graphic communications related programs nationwide currently holding this distinction.

  • HOW EASY IS IT TO EDIT DNA?

    HOW EASY IS IT TO EDIT DNA?

    In an interview on the nationally broadcast “Science Friday” radio program, Fulton Schools Assistant Professor Karmella Haynes talks about what her lab team discovered that could have a big impact on use of the new CRISPR cell-engineering technology. 

     

  • ARIZONA TECHNOLOGY AND INNOVATION: CITIZENS SCIENTISTS

    ARIZONA TECHNOLOGY AND INNOVATION: CITIZENS SCIENTISTS

    In an interview of the PBS-affiliate TV station Channel 8 in Phoenix, Micah Lande, a Fulton Schools assistant professor of manufacturing engineering, talks about what he and other ASU faculty members are doing to bring more people into Citizen Scientist endeavors.

  • ASU’S 3D PRINTED HEART MODELS FEATURED IN CBS’S NEW MEDICAL DRAMA ‘PURE GENIUS’

    ASU’S 3D PRINTED HEART MODELS FEATURED IN CBS’S NEW MEDICAL DRAMA ‘PURE GENIUS’

    While the new CBS drama featured a 3D printed heart as cutting edge technology, the  Cardiac 3D Print Lab at Phoenix Children’s Hospital, a collaboration with Arizona State University, can be traced to 2010 when art majors undergrad Justin Ryan was recruited for the team at the Image Processing Applications Lab. Ryan earned his doctorate in the biomedical engineering graduate program, and now runs the PCH lab.

  • EMCC STUDENT, FACULTY COLLABORATE TO BUILD PROSTHETIC HAND FOR CHILD

    EMCC STUDENT, FACULTY COLLABORATE TO BUILD PROSTHETIC HAND FOR CHILD

    John Hughes, a Fulton Schools mechanical engineering student who transferred from Estrella Mountain Community College, used 3D printing to create a series of prosthetic hands for a growing eight-year-old Noah Muns as a project in his Physics II class. Hughes finished his coursework at EMCC in the spring, but even after classes ended for the summer he was still hard at work perfecting Noah’s prosthetic. He continues to mentor current EMCC engineering students so they can build new prosthetics as Noah grows. 

October

2016
  • NEW SOURCE SOLAR PANELS PULL CLEAN DRINKING WATER FROM THE AIR

    NEW SOURCE SOLAR PANELS PULL CLEAN DRINKING WATER FROM THE AIR

    A new kind of solar panel is being tested in water-scarce regions of Ecuador, Jordan, and Mexico where the device, called Source, pulls moisture from the atmosphere to provide clean drinking water. Developed by ASU Associate Professor Cody Friesen’s Arizona-based startup Zero Mass Water, the setup uses solar energy to produce potable water for a family of four or an entire hospital, depending on how many panels are in use. Last year, the company raised $7 million to back a series of pilot programs to prove how simple and cost-effective access to clean water can be.

  • SCIENTISTS WARN NEGATIVE EMISSIONS ARE A ‘MORAL HAZARD’

    SCIENTISTS WARN NEGATIVE EMISSIONS ARE A ‘MORAL HAZARD’

    Fulton Schools Professor Klaus Lackner weighs in on debate about the potential impacts of using emerging carbon-capture technologies to keep the harmful effects of climate change in check. Lacker directs the Center for Negative Carbon Emissions.

  • ASU ENGINEERING PROFESSOR ON HER FIFTY-YEAR FIGHT FOR EQUALITY IN EDUCATION

    ASU ENGINEERING PROFESSOR ON HER FIFTY-YEAR FIGHT FOR EQUALITY IN EDUCATION

    Over the past 50 years, Fulton Schools Professor of Engineering Emerita Mary Anderson-Rowland has led efforts to boost diversity among Arizona State University engineering students. Even in retirement she continues to aid the cause of bringing women, underrepresented minorities and transfer students into ASU’s engineering programs.

September

2016
  • WHAT’S WHITE, SHAGGY AND COULD HELP REDUCE CARBON DIOXIDE BY 80%?

    WHAT’S WHITE, SHAGGY AND COULD HELP REDUCE CARBON DIOXIDE BY 80%?

    A “synthetic tree” created by Fulton Schools Professor Klaus Lackner and his team at the Center for Negative Carbon Emissions is capable of absorbing carbon dioxide. The technology could help reduce the accumulation of this troublesome greenhouse gas in the Earth’s atmosphere.

  • TECH GIANTS TEAM UP TO TACKLE THE ETHICS OF ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE

    TECH GIANTS TEAM UP TO TACKLE THE ETHICS OF ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE

    Amazon, Facebook, Google, Microsoft, IBM and other major players in the realm of artificial intelligence technologies are teaming up to address ethical issues arising with the rapid proliferation of AI devices — and to address misperceptions about them. Subbarao Kambhampati, Fulton Schools professor of computer science and the president of the Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence, offers some perspective on the many issues revolving around the uses of AI.

  • AVNET INNOVATION LAB IN TEMPE SEEKS NEW TECHNOLOGY ENTREPRENEURS

    AVNET INNOVATION LAB IN TEMPE SEEKS NEW TECHNOLOGY ENTREPRENEURS

    Phoenix-based technology distributor Avnet Inc. and the Arizona State University Ira A. Fulton Schools of Engineering have teamed up to accept applications for the next class of entrepreneurs for the Avnet Innovation Lab. Through the lab, entrepreneurs have access to the expertise of one of the largest technology distributors in the world – Avnet –  and Arizona State University.

  • MEXICAN ENERGY REFORM HOLDS PROMISE OF GREATER NORTH AMERICAN INTEGRATION

    MEXICAN ENERGY REFORM HOLDS PROMISE OF GREATER NORTH AMERICAN INTEGRATION

    ASU’s President Michael Crow and Leonardo Beltrán Rodriguez, deputy secretary for energy planning and transition for Mexico’s Ministry of Energy, authored an opinion piece for the Dallas Morning News.  The article references Fulton Engineering’s collaboration with the Binational Laboratory on Smart Sustainable Energy Management and Technology Training at the Instituto Tecnológico de Monterrey in Mexico City.

  • SUPERSOLDIER PROGRAMS FOR COGNITIVE ENHANCEMENT AND RUNNING SPEED

    SUPERSOLDIER PROGRAMS FOR COGNITIVE ENHANCEMENT AND RUNNING SPEED

    Air Legs, an exoskeleton that enables soldiers to run a four-minute mile, was developed in ASU Engineering Professor Tom Sugar’s Human Machine Integration Lab on the Polytechnic Campus, was featured in an article about new technologies that help make U.S. troops faster, smarter and more resilient. 

  • LEARNING LESSONS FROM OUR SEWAGE SLUDGE

    LEARNING LESSONS FROM OUR SEWAGE SLUDGE

    Fulton Schools Professor Rolf Halden explains how his research center’s work to analyze sewage sludge collected at wastewater treatments plants is providing information that could guide us in efforts to protect human health. Listen to the audio of his interview that accompanies the text of the report.

  • ASU LAB WORKING TO PREDICT CYBER ATTACKS

    ASU LAB WORKING TO PREDICT CYBER ATTACKS

    Fulton Schools Assistant Professor Paulo Shakarian talks about the work being done in his Cyber-Socio Intelligent Systems Lab to find ways to defend against cyber attacks.

  • CHROMIUM-6 IN PHOENIX WATER

    CHROMIUM-6 IN PHOENIX WATER

    Channel 8’s “Horizon” program turned to Fulton Schools Professor Paul Westerhoff, an environmental engineer, to discuss health concerns sparked by a form of the metal chromium that has shown up in some Arizona water-supply systems.

  • LURKING IN THE DEPTHS OF THE DEEPNET

    LURKING IN THE DEPTHS OF THE DEEPNET

    Paulo Shakarian, an assistant professor of computer science and engineering in the School of Computing, Informatics, and Decision Systems Engineering, talks with KJZZ’s Steve Goldstein about how his team’s ‘machine learning system’ is finding out what’s going on in the deep — especially if they’re possible starting points for cyber attacks.

  • MACHINE LEARNING IN ROBOTICS – 5 MODERN APPLICATIONS

    MACHINE LEARNING IN ROBOTICS – 5 MODERN APPLICATIONS

    The innovative work with imitation learning by Heni Ben Amor, an assistant professor of computer science and engineering at ASU,  is featured in a round of some of the more significant advancements in machine learning.  

  • COLLECTIVE GENIUS — WORKING TOGETHER ENABLES TINY ANTS TO DO VERY CLEVER THINGS

    COLLECTIVE GENIUS — WORKING TOGETHER ENABLES TINY ANTS TO DO VERY CLEVER THINGS

    Researchers reveal how ants organize themselves into complex living structures to overcome obstacles — and how such acts can provide valuable insights for engineers and robot designers. Ted Pavlic, a Fulton Schools assistant professor whose expertise includes robotics and autonomous systems, helps explain what lessons ants’ collective intelligence can teach us.

  • F.D.A. BANS SALE OF MANY ANTIBACTERIAL SOAPS, SAYING RISKS OUTWEIGH BENEFIT

    F.D.A. BANS SALE OF MANY ANTIBACTERIAL SOAPS, SAYING RISKS OUTWEIGH BENEFIT

    Rolf Halden, a School of Sustainable Engineering and the Built Environment professor and director of the Biodesign Center for Environmental Security at ASU’s Biodesign Institute, has been tracking the detrimental effects of sanitizing soaps and wipes for years. The FDA agrees.

August

2016

July

2016
  • PAKISTAN’S ENERGY SECTOR FORGING ALLIANCES FOR RESEARCH AND TECHNOLOGY

    PAKISTAN’S ENERGY SECTOR FORGING ALLIANCES FOR RESEARCH AND TECHNOLOGY

     USPCAS-E to fulfill pressing national needs for exposure to new technology and collaboration with experts

    The launch of US-Pakistan Centre for Advanced Studies in Energy at National University of Sciences and Technology (USPCAS-E) by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID), in collaboration with the Higher Education Commission (HEC) and Arizona State University (ASU), is an effort to address the chronic energy shortage in Pakistan. This partnership builds on existing talent in Pakistan by providing university faculty with exposure to new technology and an opportunity to collaborate with other experts in their fields.

  • ARIZONA UNIVERSITIES DRAWING IN TECHNOLOGY COMPANIES

    ARIZONA UNIVERSITIES DRAWING IN TECHNOLOGY COMPANIES

    Arizona technology companies are finding ASU engineering graduates with the skills to strengthen their workforce. One reason: Courses focus on providing students experiences they need to prepare for meeting the engineering challenges industry will face in coming decades.

  • GIRL SCOUTS CREATE VIDEO GAMES AT NAU

    GIRL SCOUTS CREATE VIDEO GAMES AT NAU

    For the past year the Girl Scouts have partnered with ASU Assistant Professor Ashish Amresh to host multiple “Girls Design Video Games” workshops at the ASU Polytechnic campus. Amresh directs the ASU Interactive Lab and is an Assistant Professor in Software Engineering and is leading the Computer Gaming curriculum initiatives at Arizona State University, where he founded the Computer Gaming Certificate, Camp Game and UTBC summer programs. This was their first overnight camp, and first camp at NAU.

  • RESEARCHERS DEVELOP DISSOLVABLE METAL SUPPORTS

    RESEARCHERS DEVELOP DISSOLVABLE METAL SUPPORTS

    In a 3D printing breakthrough, Fulton Schools assistant professor Owen Hildreth and collaborators at Penn State have developed a technique to print dissolvable metal supports through a new process that can replace expensive machining operations with simple low-cost chemical baths. See also a report at the science and tech new website Phys.org and the research paper in the journal 3D Printing and Additive Manufacturing.

  • HOW TO BATTLE A WICKED PROBLEM

    HOW TO BATTLE A WICKED PROBLEM

    Self-described geek, engineer and technologist Nadya Bliss, Professor of Practice in CIDSE and Director of the Global Security Initiative, weighs in on embracing “messy, interconnected” wicked problems. 

  • MEET THE MAN WHO CONTROLS DRONES WITH HIS MIND

    MEET THE MAN WHO CONTROLS DRONES WITH HIS MIND

    ASU mechanical engineer Panagiotis Artemiadis is using electrodes that detect brainwaves to expand the possibilities of controlling technology through our thoughts.

  • ASU, OTHERS AIM TO EDUCATE NEW ‘WHITE HAT HACKERS

    ASU, OTHERS AIM TO EDUCATE NEW ‘WHITE HAT HACKERS

    ASU’s Center for Global Security Initiative Director Nadya Bliss and Cybersecurity and Digital Forensics Director Gail-Jun Ahn are working with leading faculty in law, business, engineering, psychology, public service, social sciences and criminology — to define the frontiers of cyber defense technology and examine the impact of laws, policy and society.

June

2016
  • ‘SWEET TEAR SENSOR COULD EASE PAIN OF DIABETES

    ‘SWEET TEAR SENSOR COULD EASE PAIN OF DIABETES

    ASU Bioengineer Jeffrey La Belle and his team in the La Belle Lab have developed a sensor that measures the sugar in tears, paving the way for pain-free glucose testing.

  • ASU STUDENT JOHN HEFFERNAN IS ARCS SCHOLAR

    ASU STUDENT JOHN HEFFERNAN IS ARCS SCHOLAR

    The Ben & Catherine Ivy Foundation is providing a scholarship for John Heffernan, an Achievement Rewards for College Scientists scholar, pursuing a PhD in bioengineering at Arizona State University. He plans to focus on glioblastoma multiforme brain cancer research.

  • ARIZONA BUSINESSES TREADING A NEW TRADE PATH TO ASIA

    ARIZONA BUSINESSES TREADING A NEW TRADE PATH TO ASIA

    Kathy Wigal, associate director of Curricular Innovation, GOEE, who will administer the BUILD-IT Program in Vietnam, served as a panelist at the Phoenix Business Journal Global Markets Asia Experience roundtable, which rolled out a road map from Phoenix to trade in 49 different Asian countries.

  • ARIZONA TECHNOLOGY AND INNOVATION: BETTER SOLAR PANELS

    ARIZONA TECHNOLOGY AND INNOVATION: BETTER SOLAR PANELS

    A creative “marriage of technologies” enabled Fulton Schools of Engineering research teams to develop a new kind a solar cell that promises to be more efficient at generating electrical energy from sunlight.

  • THE SELF-DRIVING CAR GENERATION GAP

    THE SELF-DRIVING CAR GENERATION GAP

    Fulton Schools of Engineering Professor Brad Allenby explains why millennials and senior citizens could be sold on the idea of driverless cars by different twists on the “technology of freedom” advertising pitch.

  • ALLSTATE PLEDGES $1.5MN FOR ARIZONA STATE’S CYBERSECURITY CENTER

    ALLSTATE PLEDGES $1.5MN FOR ARIZONA STATE’S CYBERSECURITY CENTER

    Allstate has pledged $1.5 M to ASU’s Center for Cybersecurity and Digital Forensics over the next three years. “This partnership fits perfectly with the center’s mission, bringing together expertise from private industry and academia, and giving students an opportunity to get hands-on experience,” said CIDSE Professor of Practice Nadya Bliss, director of the Global Security Initiative, which houses CDF.

  • GIRLS IN STEM

    GIRLS IN STEM

    Fulton Schools’ Assist Dean of Engineering Education Tirupalavanum Ganesh and Gabriel Escontrias, Manager of ASU’s Center for Gender Equity in Science and Technology, take part in a discussion about how and why to encourage girls’ interest in science, technology, engineering and math.

  • FINDING THE FORMULA

    FINDING THE FORMULA

    Professor Nancy Cooke, chair of the human systems engineering program, led a national committee that looked at ways to ensure success in team research endeavors. Cooke and Nadya Bliss, director of ASU’s Global Security Initiative, talk about what it takes to make collaborative science and engineering click. (See page 16 of the online issue of the magazine.)

  • FINDING THE FORMULA

    FINDING THE FORMULA

    Professor Nancy Cooke, chair of the human systems engineering program, led a national committee that looked at ways to ensure success in team research endeavors. Cooke and Nadya Bliss, director of ASU’s Global Security Initiative, talk about what it takes to make collaborative science and engineering click. (See page 16 of the online issue of the magazine.)

  • WATCH THESE SYNTHETIC LEAVES SUCK CO2 OUT OF THE SKY

    WATCH THESE SYNTHETIC LEAVES SUCK CO2 OUT OF THE SKY

    Carbon-capture technology developed by the Fulton Schools’ Center for Negative Carbon Emissions is seen as a potential tool for reducing the threatening buildup of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere.

  • VALLEY FACES SECOND DAY OF POLLUTION ADVISORY

    VALLEY FACES SECOND DAY OF POLLUTION ADVISORY

    As the Phoenix Metro area was beset with its second day of high pollution advisory due to ozone levels, Albert Brown, a senior lecturer in the Polytechnic School weighs in on the different types of air pollution. 

  • PHOENIX MED-TECH STARTUP RAISES $1.4 MILLION IN SEED ROUND, PIVOTS FOCUS

    PHOENIX MED-TECH STARTUP RAISES $1.4 MILLION IN SEED ROUND, PIVOTS FOCUS

    NeoLight LLC, an ASU med-tech start-up that launched a device to treat newborn jaundice, has raised $1.4 million and expanded its product line. Working out of an office at ASU’s SkySong and the Center for Entrepreneurial Innovation business incubator on the GateWay Community College Campus, NeoLight now employs 14 engineers. 

  • ASU TECHNOLOGY COULD LOWER COOLING BILLS

    ASU TECHNOLOGY COULD LOWER COOLING BILLS

    Doctoral student Peter Firth is featured speaking about the novel nanoparticle window coating technology developed in partnership with Assistant Professor Zachary Holman. It’s estimated the coating could save families up to $100 a year in energy costs.

May

2016
  • SECRETARY OF STATE JOHN KERRY INCLUDES ASU AMONG U.S. ACADEMIC INSTITUTIONS HAVING AN IMPACT IN VIETNAM

    SECRETARY OF STATE JOHN KERRY INCLUDES ASU AMONG U.S. ACADEMIC INSTITUTIONS HAVING AN IMPACT IN VIETNAM

    During a press briefing in Ho Chi Minh City Tuesday, prior to the formal launch of Fulbright University Vietnam, Secretary of State John Kerry included Arizona State University among U.S. academic institutions having an impact in Vietnam’s academic arena.  

    “We’re also working together, excitingly, in the academic arena.  And I can’t emphasize how key that is in terms of transformational long-term impact of a relationship.  The Institute of International Education, Arizona State University, Harvard Medical School, the University of Hawaii all have partnerships with institutions in Vietnam, several involving participation by the private sector.  And tomorrow, I will have the privilege of launching the formal launch of Fulbright University Vietnam, which will be a full-fledged, non-profit and totally academically free institution.”

  • ALL-BEEF, NO BUTCHER: MEET THE MINDS BEHIND LAB-GROWN BURGERS

    ALL-BEEF, NO BUTCHER: MEET THE MINDS BEHIND LAB-GROWN BURGERS

    A study on in vitro biomass meat cultivation co-authored by SEMTE President’s Professor Braden Allenby was cited in an article about lab-grown meat as a mechanism to address the environmental and animal welfare ethics of traditional meat production.

  • PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA CITES ASU ENGINEERING PROGRAM IN VIETNAM DURING NEWS CONFERENCE WITH VIETNAMESE PRESIDENT TRAN DAI QUANG

    PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA CITES ASU ENGINEERING PROGRAM IN VIETNAM DURING NEWS CONFERENCE WITH VIETNAMESE PRESIDENT TRAN DAI QUANG

    “American academic and technological leaders, including Intel, Oracle, Arizona State University and others, will help Vietnamese universities boost training and science and technology, engineering and math.”

    ASU’s Higher Engineering Education Alliance Program (HEEAP) trains Vietnamese professors from eight universities on engineering topics.

  • WHY CO2 ‘AIR CAPTURE’ COULD BE KEY TO SLOWING GLOBAL WARMING

    WHY CO2 ‘AIR CAPTURE’ COULD BE KEY TO SLOWING GLOBAL WARMING

    Physicist Klaus Lackner has been pioneering technology to extract carbon dioxide from the atmosphere to combat climate change. As CO2 emissions continue to soar, the Ira A. Fulton Schools of Engineering professor says such “air capture” approaches may be our last best hope.

  • TEACHER SHOWS STUDENTS SUCCESS THROUGH TEAMWORK; INSPIRES COMMUNITY THROUGH ACHIEVEMENT

    TEACHER SHOWS STUDENTS SUCCESS THROUGH TEAMWORK; INSPIRES COMMUNITY THROUGH ACHIEVEMENT

    Mehulkumar Gandhi, a math teacher at San Luis Middle School in Yuma led his CISCO-Supported Arizona FIRST ® LEGO® League team, the Scorpiotics, to win the Champion’s Award. Arizona FIRST ® LEGO® League is an Ira A. Fulton Schools K-12 Engineering Education and Outreach program designed to ignite an enthusiasm for the basic principles of science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) in children ages nine to 14.

  • WHY WE NEED MORE WOMEN ENGINEERS

    WHY WE NEED MORE WOMEN ENGINEERS

    ASU President Michael Crow asserts we must do better when it comes to recruiting women engineering students.

  • CROW SAYS ‘THE SYSTEM NEEDS TO BE BLOWN UP’

    CROW SAYS ‘THE SYSTEM NEEDS TO BE BLOWN UP’

    ASU President Michael Crow participated in the Keynote Panel at the U.S. News STEM Solutions Conference in Baltimore this week. Crow describes how ASU Engineering grew from 8,500 students with a 68 percent freshman retention rate in 2008 to 17,000 engineering students with a 90 percent freshman retention rate today. (President Crow joins the panel discussion at about the one-hour mark in the video.)

  • PROFESSORS FROM VIETNAM LEARN TEACHING METHODS FROM ASU

    PROFESSORS FROM VIETNAM LEARN TEACHING METHODS FROM ASU

    David Benson, the academic director of ASU’s Higher Engineering Education Alliance Program (HEEAP), works with visiting professors from Vietnamese universities to learn new ways to teach and explain material to their students.

  • FERNANDO TO RECEIVE HONORARY DEGREE FROM UNIVERSITY OF DUNDEE

    FERNANDO TO RECEIVE HONORARY DEGREE FROM UNIVERSITY OF DUNDEE

    Harindra Joseph Fernando, former Fulton Engineering professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering and founding director of the Arizona Board of Regent’s Center for Environmental Fluid Dynamics. has been selected to receive an honorary doctorate from the University of Dundee, a preeminent public research university in the United Kingdom.

  • EXCLUSIVE: AVNET AND ASU PARTNER ON NEW INNOVATION INCUBATOR TO FURTHER TECH STARTUPS

    EXCLUSIVE: AVNET AND ASU PARTNER ON NEW INNOVATION INCUBATOR TO FURTHER TECH STARTUPS

    Phoenix-based Avnet, Inc. and Arizona State have partnered to create a new innovation incubator for technology startups.

    The first four companies are: Pit Rho, which will design and test a smart retail bag that enhances the shopping experience; XL Hybrids Inc., which is building an auto and truck fleet electrification business; The Youngbull Lab at ASU is working to create an early-warning system that monitors for microbes and other biological agents, and Zero Mass Labs, which is removing volatile organic compounds from the polymers industry.

  • ANAYA ASSUMES POST AS INTERIM MAYOR OF SOMERTON

    ANAYA ASSUMES POST AS INTERIM MAYOR OF SOMERTON

    Lifelong Somerton resident Gerardo Anaya, an ASU Engineering alumni, is becoming an interim mayor of Somerton during a pivotal moment in the city’s development. Work has begun on the construction of a city hall. The hope is this will spur redevelopment downtown. Anaya will be overseeing these measures. 

  • ENGINEERING DEAN CANDIDATE EMPHASIZES COMMUNICATION

    ENGINEERING DEAN CANDIDATE EMPHASIZES COMMUNICATION

    Former Fulton School of Engineering Dean (1995-2006) Peter Crouch is a candidate for engineering dean at the University of Texas, Arlington. Crouch has shared a plan for the the future of the engineering school that stresses the need for student growth and research programs.

April

2016
  • CHILDREN LIVING IN LOWER-INCOME AREAS ARE MORE SUSCEPTIBLE TO ASTHMA

    CHILDREN LIVING IN LOWER-INCOME AREAS ARE MORE SUSCEPTIBLE TO ASTHMA

    James Anderson, professor emeritus at the School for Engineering of Matter, Transport and Energy at Arizona State University, who has studied air quality in Arizona extensively for years, is cited in an Arizona Republic article about children vulnerable to asthma.

  • CUBIC’S TECH INNOVATIONS HELPING PEOPLE OVERCOME DISABILITIES

    CUBIC’S TECH INNOVATIONS HELPING PEOPLE OVERCOME DISABILITIES

    Professor Sethuraman “Panch” Panchanathan was interviewed on the “Horizon” news and public affairs program about the Fulton Schools of Engineering’s Center for Cognitive Ubiquitous Computing (CUbiC), where researchers are using machine learning, pattern recognition, haptics and human-computer interaction technologies to aid people living with physical disability challenges. Panchanathan founded and directs the center.

  • MEET ANAYA: AN ANALYTICAL AND CREATIVE 13 YEAR-OLD

    MEET ANAYA: AN ANALYTICAL AND CREATIVE 13 YEAR-OLD

    Anaya, a recent participant of our Wednesday’s Child and K-12 Outreach program, was part of a private session with one of Ira A. Fulton’s own Evelyn Holguin, a sophomore at Arizona State University. It was at this private session that Anaya realized that her passion for legos could segway into an engineering career. 

  • BUSINESS FOR BREAKFAST FEATURES ASU FULTON SUMMER CAMPS

    BUSINESS FOR BREAKFAST FEATURES ASU FULTON SUMMER CAMPS

    Assistant Professor Shane Underwood, Ira A. Fulton Schools of Engineering School of Sustainability and the Built Environment and Shane Bycott, Coordinator Sr. K-12 Engineering Education and Outreach, were guests on the April 14 “Business for Breakfast” talk show on MoneyRadio1015.

    The “two Shanes,” as they were introduced by hosts  Ken Morgan and Mark Asher, outlined some of the many summer camp programs offered through Fulton Engineering this summer. You can listen to their interview at 27:15 mark in the program. 

  • ASU ESPORTS TEAM MAKES FINAL FOUR IN HEROES OF THE DORM TOURNAMENT

    ASU ESPORTS TEAM MAKES FINAL FOUR IN HEROES OF THE DORM TOURNAMENT

    After weeks of competition, a group of Arizona State University students, including two from Ira A. Fulton Schools of Engineering, beat teams from across the country to secure a spot in the final four of a tournament called Heroes of the Dorm.

  • RESURRECTING ARIZONA’S GHOST TOWNS

    RESURRECTING ARIZONA’S GHOST TOWNS

    Brady Falk, biomedical engineering major, is one of 170 Barrett, the Honors College students presenting at the Celebrating Honors symposium on the Tempe campus. He has always been interested in healthy lifestyles and wearable technology. His project is a workout shirt with integrated sensors to predict fatigue in military personnel.

  • UNIVERSITIES BRING KNOWLEDGE, CURIOSITY TO HANOVER

    UNIVERSITIES BRING KNOWLEDGE, CURIOSITY TO HANOVER

    Arizona Technology Enterprises (AzTE) brought some of its startups to Germany’s Hannover Messe Technology and Trade show, including ASU’s very own Fluidic Energy, an ASU spin out that is partnering with Caterpillar Inc. and PLN, Indonesia’s state-owned electricity company. Together they will provide power to 500 remote villages and 1.7 million people. 

  • SRP/ASU TEAM UP IN RESEARCH AT POWER PLANT

    SRP/ASU TEAM UP IN RESEARCH AT POWER PLANT

    Researchers at Arizona State University and engineers at Salt River Project are conducting joint research studies to find new ways to use algae in the desert, specifically in the operation of power plants.

March

2016
  • 2016 HDD ACADEMY RESOUNDING SUCCESS

    2016 HDD ACADEMY RESOUNDING SUCCESS

    The 2016 Horizontal Directional Drilling Academy was hosted by the Arizona State University Del E. Webb School of Construction and Benjamin Media Inc., February 11-12. ASU Engineering Professor Samuel Ariaratnam and Academy sponsors worked to put on the second annual conference where more than 120 drillers from across North America gathered to discuss new HDD technologies.

  • BRAIN-ZAPPING GADGETS PROMISE TO MAKE YOU A BETTER YOU

    BRAIN-ZAPPING GADGETS PROMISE TO MAKE YOU A BETTER YOU

    William “Jamie” Tyler, ASU Assoc. Professor, SBHSE, co-founder of ASU spin-off Thync, addresses the wearable tech device and the future of stimulating key regions of the brain — with currents or magnetic fields — to affect emotions and physical well-being. 

  • WRONG PIPES INSTALLED AT BART BERRYESSA STATION

    WRONG PIPES INSTALLED AT BART BERRYESSA STATION

    When an NBC Bay Area Investigative Unit discovered that the BART extension from East Bay to San Jose had installed cast iron pipe instead of PCV pipe, ASU’s Professor Samuel Ariaratnam, chair of SSEBE’s construction engineering program, was consulted about the significance of the mistake. (Video no longer available.)

  • SHAWN GODDEYNE, P.E. NAMED YOUNG ENGINEER OF THE YEAR

    SHAWN GODDEYNE, P.E. NAMED YOUNG ENGINEER OF THE YEAR

    The Piedmont chapter of the South Carolina Society of Professional Engineers (SCSPE) has named Tindall’s Shawn Goddeyne, P.E. Young Engineer of the Year (YEOY). This award honors engineers who make outstanding contributions to the engineering profession and the community during the early years of their career. Goddeyne graduated from Arizona State University in 2006 with a Bachelors in Civil Engineering and again in 2008 with a Masters of Science in Structural Engineering.

February

2016
  • DAEDALUS ASTRONAUTICS ROCKET LAUNCH

    DAEDALUS ASTRONAUTICS ROCKET LAUNCH

    As a preview to Night of the Open Door events on the Tempe campus on Feb. 27, KPNX 12News featured the Daedalus Astronautics rocket awareness activities. Daedalus, a student-run organization dedicated to the design, manufacture, and launching of sounding rockets, sponsored hands-on water bottle and air compressor rocket launch activities. 

January

2016
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