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February

2018
  • 5 Terracon women engineers diversifying the industry

    5 Terracon women engineers diversifying the industry

    Three Fulton Schools alumni are among five women with the engineering consulting firm Terracon who are profiled in a feature story published in conjunction with National Engineers Week. Brittany Dalton, Kendra Clouse and Marissa Raleigh play key roles in providing the company’s environmental, geotechnical, facilities and materials services, and also contribute to the workforce diversity that employers say maximizes innovation, creativity and competitiveness.

  • Should AI bots lie? Hard truths about artificial intelligence

    Should AI bots lie? Hard truths about artificial intelligence

    Fulton Schools computer scientists Tathagata Chakraborti and Subbarao Kambhampati discuss effective collaboration between humans and artificial intelligence technologies in a recent paper, Algorithms for the Greater Good!. They point out that it’s not enough to make AI smart. AI developers must make sure the AI bot works well with human intelligence, in all its wild variety, including different cultural norms, if we are to avoid serious problems.

  • China’s massive investment in artificial intelligence has an insidious downside

    China’s massive investment in artificial intelligence has an insidious downside

    China is on the cusp of pursuing big advances in artificial intelligence technologies and capabilities. Fulton Schools Professor Subbarao Kambhampati, president of the Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence, is among AI experts who say that raises expectations for breakthroughs in the field but also stokes worries about how the country may use AI systems to increase public surveillance and censorship,  and boost its military power.

  • Trump’s solar tariff and proposed energy cut troubles ASU professors

    Trump’s solar tariff and proposed energy cut troubles ASU professors

    Proposed budget cuts to the Department of Energy and a trade tariff on the photovoltaic panels that produce solar energy could burden the solar power industry and reduce energy research funding. A fuding rollback could impact graduate students involved in research projects to earn their degrees, says Fulton Schools Assistant Professor Zachary Holman. The tariff may mean some tough times for solar technology installers but the movement toward renewable energy sources will continue growing, says Ron Roedel, director of the Fulton Schools’ Solar Energy Engineering and Commercialization master’s degree program.

  • ‘Jackpotting’ reaches US shores, drain millions from ATM

    ‘Jackpotting’ reaches US shores, drain millions from ATM

    It’s a cyberspace form of bank robbery. Called “jackpotting,” it’s perpetrated by computer system hackers who find ways to get bank ATM machines to dispense large sums of money. Paulo Shakarian, a Fulton Schools Entrepreneurial Professor and director of Cyber-Socio Intelligent Systems Laboratory, says combating the crime will require close surveillance of the “dark web” to uncover the schemes of potential jackpotting hackers.

  • We Can Pull CO2 from Air, But It’s No Silver Bullet for Climate Change, Scientists Warn

    We Can Pull CO2 from Air, But It’s No Silver Bullet for Climate Change, Scientists Warn

    Fulton Schools Professor Klaus Lackner, director of ASU’s Center for Negative Carbon Emissions, says merely reducing emissions of carbon dioxide won’t be nearly enough to reduce the rising environmental threat from the buildup of greenhouses gases in the Earth’s atmosphere. It’s critical to also further develop and employ new carbon-capture technologies to remove significant amounts of the CO2 that’s already there.

     

  • Hoolest wins top prize at ASU Innovation Open

    Hoolest wins top prize at ASU Innovation Open

    Three Fulton Schools students won the grand prize of a $100,000 investment in their business venture idea at the ASU Innovation Open entrepreneurship competition. Nicholas Hool, Sami Mian and John Patterson make up the team behind Hoolest Performance Technologies. Their stress-relief product consists of earbuds that emit an electrical stimulation that activates the body’s relaxation response.

    Read also:

    Phoenix Business Journal: Meet the student startup that won$100,000in ASU/Avnet competition

    AZBIO:  Hoolest wins top prize at ASU Open

    KTAR Radio News: ASU student-led business wins $100K at Innovation Open

  • Freshman team outranks upperclassmen in national ‘Domesday’ competition

    Freshman team outranks upperclassmen in  national ‘Domesday’ competition

    Fulton Schools materials science and engineering students Joshua Burchard, Bryan Ugaz and Sayquon Washington went up against 10 teams of more experienced undergraduate and graduate students in a national geodesic dome design competition. Their medal dome project, featuring an intricate 3-D printed design that incorporated 31 polygons, earned the three freshmen the top prize.

  • ASU international students overcome challenges to succeed as Sun Devils

    ASU international students overcome challenges to succeed as Sun Devils

    Fulton Schools electrical engineering graduate student Anik Jha, a native of India, is among international students at ASU who say that while they face challenges going to school in the United States, but that the university works to help them acclimate to the social environment and to succeed in their academic endeavors.

  • The possibility of AI going rogue is more than just science fiction

    The possibility of AI going rogue is more than just science fiction

    Fulton Schools Assistant Professor Ted Pavlic talks about the need for engineers and scientists developing artificial intelligence technologies to be more aware of the potential for unintended consequences in employing AI systems in ways that might have harmful impacts.  Computer science major Matthew Acosta says students should get more training on the ethical issues revolving around the uses of AI.

January

2018
  • Astronauts Vs. Robots: The Case Against Sending Human Crews Beyond Low-Earth Orbit

    Astronauts Vs. Robots: The Case Against Sending Human Crews Beyond Low-Earth Orbit

    Robots are our best option for less risky and more effective space exploration, says Fulton Schools Associate Professor Panagiotis Artemiades, director of the Human-Oriented Robotics and Control Lab. Making robots our astronauts could free up time and funding for humans to focus on solving other technological challenges, as well as answering some big cosmological and philosophical questions about our world and the universe, says Forbes magazine’s technology, aerospace and astronomy writer.

  • Hackers bring “jackpotting” to the U.S.

    Hackers bring “jackpotting” to the U.S.

    A recent outbreak of cyberattacks targeting ATM machines has led to the theft of more than $1 million from banks in the United States. Fulton Schools Entrepreneurial Professor Paulo Shakarian, the CEO of a cybersecurity intelligence startup, said the company was able to track an uptick of communications on the dark web about new hacking hardware that’s been used in the ATM thefts, as well as the sale of a guidebook on such “jackpotting” schemes

  • Q&A: How can research support the new dod national defense strategy?

    Q&A: How can research support the new dod national defense strategy?

    The U.S. Department of Defense has developed a comprehensive new National Defense Strategy in response to the varied and complex technological challenges to ensuring the country’s security. Fulton Schools Professor of Practice Nadya Bliss, director of Arizona State University’s Global Security Initiative, talks about what university researchers are capable of doing to support the defense department’s goals.

  • New solar tariffs create uncertainty for Arizona renewables industry

    New solar tariffs create uncertainty for Arizona renewables industry

    Photovoltaic solar energy panels are among imports on which the United States recently placed significantly high trade tariffs. The action could have negative impacts on U.S. solar energy system installers, says Ron Roedel, a Fulton Schools professor emeritus who directs the Solar Energy Engineering and Commercialization graduate program.

  • Robots taking over the world? It’s a good thing, researchers say

    Robots taking over the world? It’s a good thing, researchers say

    The Southwest Robotics Symposium hosted by Arizona State University looked at how Artificial Intelligence technology applied to robotics systems can make the world a better place. Fulton Schools faculty members Panagiotis Artemiades, Thomas Sugar, Hamid Marvi and Heni Ben Amor describe AI as the mechanism that will enable robots to help humans in homes, work places, hospitals and almost everywhere else.

  • Trashing the old way of doing things

    Trashing the old way of doing things

    Fulton Schools student Surya Iyer’s idea to boost the efficiency of waste management won a spot in the finals of the ASU Innovation Open competition for a $100,000 grand prize. His prototype for a “smart” garbage container uses a sensor to detect how much trash is in a trash can and makes the information accessible remotely through internet-connected devices.

  • ASU student payloads selected to fly on blue origin space vehicle

    ASU student payloads selected to fly on blue origin space vehicle

    Ten Fulton Schools students make up two of the teams that earned a place in a technology competition involving the New Shepherd spacecraft and the rocket company Blue Origin, owned by Amazon founder Jeff Bezos. One team’s project will focus on measuring and collecting data on how space affects human sight, smell, taste tough and hearing. The other project will study how pollinating bees might react in space and what that would mean for efforts to establish agriculture away from Earth.

    See also: Parabolic Arc

  • New global futures initiative asks how humankind can extend earth’s habitability

    New global futures initiative asks how humankind can extend earth’s habitability

    Arizona State University is expanding its role in sustainability education and research with the establishment of the New Global Futures Initiative. Its directive is to “take a broad look at the trajectory of our planet” and to help figure out ways that we can manage the world “in ways that achieve sustainable habitability.” At the helm of the new initiative is Peter Schlosser, who now has a joint appointment in the Fulton Schools of Engineering.

  • Arizona State University Partners with DASH to fund research, scholarships

    Arizona State University Partners with DASH to fund research, scholarships

    Work led by Fulton Schools Research Professor Dragan Boscovic, director of ASU’s Blockchain Research Lab, has spurred formation of a partnership between the university and Dash, a leading blockchain-powered digital currency. In addition to research funding, the partnership will enable development of an online graduate Blockchain technology and application course and scholarships for undergraduate and graduate student research fellowships.

    See more news coverage: CoinJournalASU NowBitcoinistAZ Big MediaBlockTribuneDash Force NewsPhoenix Business Journal

     

  • Bashas’ installs revolutionary sub-zero industrial freezer

    Bashas’ installs revolutionary sub-zero industrial freezer

    Fulton Schools Assistant Professor Kristen Parrish and sustainable engineering doctoral student Neda Askari are helping the Basha’s grocery chain improve the energy efficiency and cost savings of its industrial-scale food freezer storage. Working with the Salt River Project power utility and the Viking Cold Solutions company, they will be assessing whether the thermal energy storage system model they’ve developed can be adapted for other industrial facilities.

  • Valle Luna “Making a Difference”- ASU’s Kyle Williams

    Valle Luna “Making a Difference”- ASU’s Kyle Williams

    Kyle Williams, wide receiver for the Arizona State University Sun Devils football team and Fulton Schools biomedical engineering student, has his sights sets on becoming an orthopedic surgeon. Professor Marco Santello, director of the School of Biological and Health Systems Engineering, explains how Williams and other students in the same degree program are preparing for medical school by learning about the latest in neuroscience, tissue engineering, synthetic biology, neurorehabilitation and related biomedical areas.

  • ASU developing biodegradable plastics made from bacteria

    ASU developing biodegradable plastics made from bacteria

    Billions of metric tons of discarded plastics are posing an environmental hazard around the world. Research by Fulton Schools Assistant Professor Taylor Weiss could help to diminish that threat. He’s designing a “symbiotic partnership” between two forms of bacteria to make bioplastics that would harmlessly biodegrade at a relatively rapid pace.

  • Questioning AI: What are the key research challenges?

    Questioning AI: What are the key research challenges?

    Fulton Schools Professor Subbarao Kambhampati is featured in the debut episode of the science and technology podcast miniseries “Questioning Artificial Intelligence.” He joins another leading AI research in exploring issues arising from the proliferation of AI technologies and their widely varying applications. Kambhampati is the president of the international Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence.

December

2017
  • Unfiltered Fervor: The Rush to Get Off the Water Grid

    Unfiltered Fervor: The Rush to Get Off the Water Grid

    Zero Mass Water, a startup company that grew out of research led by Cody Friesen, a Fulton Schools associate professor of materials science, is among purveyors of what is being called “live water,” “raw water” or “real water.” They’re part of the “water consciousness movement” that is sparking debates about the pros and cons of water treatment infrastructure and water purification processes, and the resulting health benefits or drawbacks of both treated and untreated water.

  • Gallium nitride processor: Next-generation technology for space exploration

    Gallium nitride processor: Next-generation technology for space exploration

    Gallium nitride is a promising new semiconductor material with properties that enable it to operate at higher voltages, frequencies and temperatures at higher efficiencies than silicon. With support from NASA, Fulton Schools Assistant Professor Yuji Zhao and his research team are working on ways to use the material to develop a high-temperature microprocessor for space mission applications. The article was also published by  Tech News n’ GadgetsPhys.org, and ECN (Electronics Component News) magazine.  Read more about Zhao’s gallium nitride research.

  • Can We Suck Enough CO2 From The Air to Save The Climate?

    Can We Suck Enough CO2 From The Air to Save The Climate?

    As much as alternative energy sources such and solar and wind power might help reduce the detrimental impacts of climate change, what would really help is technology that removes greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. Fulton Schools professor Klaus Lackner, a pioneer of carbon-capture technology, thinks that cost-efficient systems to remove carbon dioxide are a surmountable challenge.

  • ASU Explores Groundbreaking Collaboration With Vietnam

    ASU Explores Groundbreaking Collaboration With Vietnam

    Ongoing global outreach efforts led by the Fulton Schools to help modernize higher education in Vietnam are bringing benefits to both research and education at Arizona State University. The signing of a new collaboration agreement between ASU and one of Vietnam’s leading universities will enable more long-term joint ventures, including student and faculty exchange programs and new research projects, as well as economic development and entrepreneurship opportunities. Read more.

  • AI in 2017 can’t nearly match the smarts of ‘Star Wars’ Droids

    AI in 2017 can’t nearly match the smarts of ‘Star Wars’ Droids

    Artificial intelligence technology that thinks, understands humans and acts accordingly? For now, you will see it only in fiction like the “Star Wars” movies, says computer scientist, robotics and AI expert Subbarao Kambhampati. Progress is being made in developing AI that can assist people, says the Fulton Schools professor, but we are still far, far away from seeing something with the intellectual capabilities and emotional intuition of the “Star Wars” droids R2-D2 and BB-8.

  • One Step At A Time

    One Step At A Time

    A soft robotic exosuit developed in a project led by Fulton Schools Assistant Professors Panagiotis Polygerinos and Wenlong Zhang is being tested by the Barrow Neurological Institute therapists for use in helping stroke victims regain mobility. Systems engineering doctoral students Saivimal Sridar and Zhi (George) Qiao are also involved in the research on the exosuit being conducted in Zhang’s Robotics and Intelligent Systems Lab and the Bio-inspired Mechatronics Lab directed by Polygerinos.

November

2017
  • Sandstone and metal louvres wrap massive student housing complex in Arizona

    Sandstone and metal louvres wrap massive student housing complex in Arizona

    The popular international architecture and design website gave a big photo spread to the Fulton Schools’ new student residence complex, the Tooker House. The architects are lauded for a design theme that mimics the colors and textures of Arizona’s Sonoran Desert environment.

  • Robotic fish could help solve problem in Arizona canals

    Robotic fish could help solve problem in Arizona canals

    A team of engineering doctoral students led by Fulton Schools Assistant Professor Daniel Aukes is developing robotic fish as a potential tool for the Salt River Project power and water utility. The robo-fish could help reduce the overgrowth of pondweed and other underwater vegetation that is hindering water flow in SRP’s canal system in the Phoenix metro area.

  • Real ‘Mission Impossible’: Thwarting hackers with individuals’ biosignals

    Real ‘Mission Impossible’: Thwarting hackers with individuals’ biosignals

    The next big thing in technology designed to defend against hackers could come from Jae-sun Seo, a Fulton Schools professor of electrical engineering, and his research collaborators. They are developing security authentication based on the electrical activity of an individuals’ heartbeats. It may offer advantages over even the fingerprint, retinal-scan and facial-recognition technologies being used to protect systems and devices from getting hacked.

  • Can Carbon-Dioxide Removal Save the World?

    Can Carbon-Dioxide Removal Save the World?

    We should look at carbon dioxide in our atmosphere like we look at garbage and sewage: as a waste product to be disposed of to protect our human and environmental health, says Fulton Schools professor Klaus Lackner. Research directed by Lackner at the Center for Negative Carbon Emissions focuses on developing carbon-capture technology to help reduce the potentially dangerous buildup of carbon dioxide around the world.

  • I’m a pacifist, so why don’t I support the Campaign to Stop Killer Robots?

    I’m a pacifist, so why don’t I support the Campaign to Stop Killer Robots?

    Fulton Schools Professor Subbarao Kambhampati responds to a call for a ban on autonomous robotic weapons with a warning about what negative unintended consequences might arise from such a drastic restriction. Kambhampati is president of the international Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence.

  • Meet Zero Mass Water, Whose Solar Panels Pull Drinking Water From The Air

    Meet Zero Mass Water, Whose Solar Panels Pull Drinking Water From The Air

    Fulton Schools associate professor of materials science and engineering Cody Freisen used nanomaterials, physics and solar energy to create his startup venture, Zero Mass Water. The technology, which produces drinkable water by capturing moisture from the air, could help water-deprived regions throughout the world.

  • Endovantage gains US FDA 510(k) clearance for Surgicalpreview

    Endovantage gains US FDA 510(k) clearance for Surgicalpreview

    David Frakes, a Fulton Schools associate professor of biomedical engineering, is one of the founders of the Endovantage venture. The company has gotten approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for a new tool for preoperative planning. Called Surgical Preview, it is designed to enable physicians to use 3D modeling and visualization of surgical placement of endovascular devices in patients. The goal is to reduce the risks to patients and improve outcomes.

September

2017
  • HOW WORRIED SHOULD WE BE ABOUT ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE?

    HOW WORRIED SHOULD WE BE ABOUT ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE?

    AI is both terrifying and exciting. There is no doubt that as AI continues to improve it will radically change the way we live. That can provide improvements, like self-driving cars, and doing many jobs that could in principle release humans to pursue more fulfilling activities. Or it could produce massive unemployment, and provide new vulnerabilities to hacking. Sophisticated cyber-hacking could undermine the reliability of information we receive everyday on the internet, and weaken national and international infrastructures.

    Nevertheless, fortune favors the prepared mind, so it is important to explore all the possibilities, both good and bad, now, to help us be better prepared for a future that will arrive whether we like it or not. — Lawrence Krauss, director, Origins Project and Fulton Engineering professor, ASU

July

2017
  • U.S. Department Of Defense Brain Study Seeks To Boost Learning In Soldiers

    U.S. Department Of Defense Brain Study Seeks To Boost Learning In Soldiers

    Advances in neuroengineering are creating possibilities for enhancing human learning abilities and cognitive performance. Fulton Schools Associate Professors Stephen Helms Tillery and Chris Buneo explain the “targeted” neuroplasticity research they are conducting with other ASU faculty members to help the U.S. Department of Defense provide more effective training for the nation’s soldiers.

  • 4 SCIENCE-BACKED HEALTH BENEFITS OF EATING ORGANIC

    4 SCIENCE-BACKED HEALTH BENEFITS OF EATING ORGANIC

    With the organic food market booming, consumers should be equipped with the facts about what organic actually means and doesn’t mean, and what benefits or risks may be involved in producing and consuming organic products. Fulton Schools Professor Rolf Halden, director of the Center for Environmental Security, says even people adhering to strict organic food diets need broader knowledge about nutrition and health to make wiser food choices.

  • WHAT ARE URBAN HEAT ISLANDS?

    WHAT ARE URBAN HEAT ISLANDS?

    Growing cities must become more aware of the factors that create “urban heat islands” and causes them to intensify. Kamil Kaloush, Fulton Schools associate professor of civil, environmental and sustainable engineering, and director of the National Center of Excellence for SMART Innovations, says making smarter choices about what materials to use in the construction of buildings, roads, parking lots and other civic infrastructure is critical in preventing a rise in ambient heat that makes urban environments not only less comfortable but also less sustainable.

  • BUILDING PROS SHARE JOB SKILLS WITH GILA RIVER STUDENTS

    BUILDING PROS SHARE JOB SKILLS WITH GILA RIVER STUDENTS

    The School of Sustainable Engineering the Built Environment, one of the six Fulton Schools, teamed up with a major Southwest construction contracting company to give young students from the Gila River Indian Community hands-on lessons in construction and engineering skills, and critical thinking.

  • WHERE THERE’S A WILL, IS THERE A WALL? BUILDING TRUMP’S BORDER WALL WON’T BE CHEAP

    WHERE THERE’S A WILL, IS THERE A WALL? BUILDING TRUMP’S BORDER WALL WON’T BE CHEAP

    The massive wall that President Donald Trump proposes to build along the United State-Mexico border would entail more than a significant cost, but also big energy use, environmental safety and construction logistics challenges. Barzin Mobasher, Fulton Schools professor of civil, environmental and sustainable engineering, points to some of the difficulties that could be encountered in developing the infrastructure and obtaining the resources to support the project.

    Also See:

    Mobasher is quoted in a July 21 Cronkite News report ‘Structurally deficient’ bridge over I-17 repaired using new technology

  • TO AVOID CLIMATE CATASTROPHE, WE’LL NEED TO REMOVE CO2 FROM THE AIR. HERE’S HOW

    TO AVOID CLIMATE CATASTROPHE, WE’LL NEED TO REMOVE CO2 FROM THE AIR. HERE’S HOW

    One of the more promising systems to stem the negative impacts of climate change by capturing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere is being developed by the research team of physicist Klaus Lackner, Fulton Schools professor of civil, environmental and sustainable engineering and director of ASU’s Center for Negative Carbon Emissions. Lacker tells Ensia, a magazine focusing on solutions to environmental challenges, that such a system theoretically could remove CO2 from the air many times more efficiently than plants.

  • SUN DEVILS AND SOLAR ENERGY: ASU RESEARCHERS AWARDED MORE THAN $4 MILLION TO DEVELOP SOLAR ENERGY SOLUTIONS

    SUN DEVILS AND SOLAR ENERGY: ASU RESEARCHERS AWARDED MORE THAN $4 MILLION TO DEVELOP SOLAR ENERGY SOLUTIONS

    Fulton Schools faculty members Mariana Bertoni, Stuart Bowden, Owen Hildreth, Govindasamy Tamizhmani  and Meng Tao are among researchers whose projects to develop innovative and affordable solar power technologies won support from the U.S. Department of Energy SunShot Initiative program — giving ASU more of these research awards than any other university.

  • A.I. SCIENTISTS TO ELON MUSK: STOP SAYING ROBOTS WILL KILL US ALL

    A.I. SCIENTISTS TO ELON MUSK: STOP SAYING ROBOTS WILL KILL US ALL

    Fulton Schools Professor Subbarao Kambhampati, president of the Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence, joined other experts in the field who say prominent inventor and entrepreneur Elon Musk is spreading an overly alarmist message about supposed threats that could someday be posed by advanced AI technology.

    Also See:

    AI Researchers Disagree With Elon Musk’s Warnings About Artificial Intelligence, Futurism, July 19

    Artificial Intelligence Experts Rebut Elon Musk’s Warning and Call for Regulation, The Christian Post, July 20

    Elon Musk SLAMMED by top researchers for scaremongering over dangers of AI, Express (United Kingdom), July 20

  • SCIENTISTS ARE SCRUTINIZING CITY SEWAGE TO STUDY OUR HEALTH

    SCIENTISTS ARE SCRUTINIZING CITY SEWAGE TO STUDY OUR HEALTH

    What’s flowing into wastewater treatments plants can reveal a treasure trove of information about our health and the health of our environment, says Fulton Schools Professor Rolf Halden. Those findings could help us prevent diseases, pinpoint environmental hazards and track our exposure to chemicals that might be harmful.

    Also See:

    Studying Wastewater Could Be Messy, But it May Improve Public Health, KJZZ (NPR), July 19

June

2017

May

2017
  • REPAIRING INFRASTRUCTURE FROM THE GROUND UP

    REPAIRING INFRASTRUCTURE FROM THE GROUND UP

    Fulton Schools Professor Samuel Ariaratnam was interviewed on a popular weekly podcast that probes into the intertwined subjects of emerging technologies, the Internet of Things and other facets of “the digital life.” Ariaratnam, chair of the construction engineering program, talked about what today’s “smart” cities must do to get even smarter about the use of advanced technologies for rehabilitating their urban infrastructures.

  • ROBOTIC TURTLES CAN BE USED TO DETECT LANDMINES IN THE DESERT

    ROBOTIC TURTLES CAN BE USED TO DETECT LANDMINES IN THE DESERT

    One of the latest and most inventive efforts springing for Heni Ben Amor’s expertise in robot-learning algorithms are small machines whose design is based on sea turtle anatomy and mobility style. The Fulton Schools assistant professor’s “turtle bots,” made from motors, computer chips and cardboard folded in origami style, are being tested on Arizona’s desert terrain to see how they would perform as battlefield landmine detectors.

    Also See:

    ASU Robotics turns to nature for inspiration, CBS 5 News Phoenix, June 5

    An Army of these odd-looking robotics ‘turtles’ might help rid the world of landmines, Digital Trends, May 27

    These flat-pack turtlebots will crawl across minefields for safety’s sake, TechCrunch, May 25

    These robotic turtles could save your life, New York Post, May 25

  • ARIZONA STATE UNIVERSITY STUDENTS, ADOT TEAM UP TO CREATE NEW TYPE OF CATTLE GUARD

    ARIZONA STATE UNIVERSITY STUDENTS, ADOT TEAM UP TO CREATE NEW TYPE OF CATTLE GUARD

    A senior-year engineering capstone design project led four recent Fulton Schools graduates to a collaboration with the Arizona Department of Transportation Research Center. The result is a prototype for a new kind of cattle guard using ultrasonic sensors and decoy predator sounds to prevent the grazing animals from stepping into the path of vehicles. Project team members Kevin Davidson and Marissa Rubio recently received degrees in mechanical engineering systems. Hanqing Chen graduated with an electrical systems engineering degree. Zhemin Ne earned a degree in auto systems engineering.

    Also See:
    ADOT enlists ASU engineering majors to help create new cattle guard concept, ADOT Blog, May 11

  • ARIZONA TEAM ONE OF TWO DOZEN WORKING TO MAKE HYPERLOOP TRAVEL POSSIBLE

    ARIZONA TEAM ONE OF TWO DOZEN WORKING TO MAKE HYPERLOOP TRAVEL POSSIBLE

    A multi-university team led by Fulton Schools students is preparing to move from the design stage to prototype testing this summer as it develops a high-speed terrestrial transport pod for the international SpaceX Hyperloop challenge. The team is one of 24 that has made it to the final round of the competition. Mechanical engineering grad student Lynne Nethken (pictured) was interviewed about the AZLoop project.

  • ARIZONA STATE UNIVERSITY STUDENTS FINISH $80,000 MOBILE DENTAL CLINIC FOR CHARITY

    ARIZONA STATE UNIVERSITY STUDENTS FINISH $80,000 MOBILE DENTAL CLINIC FOR CHARITY

    Engineering Smiles, a student endeavor that began several years ago in a Fulton Schools Engineering Projects in Community Service course, is realizing its goal of providing a mobile dental clinic to underserved communities. Among the project’s leaders (pictured at right) are Sara Mantlik , who just received a master’s degree in mechanical engineering, and Nick Kemme, who is pursuing a similar degree.

  • HOW RUSSIA’S HACKING AND INFLUENCE OPS HELP PUTIN

    HOW RUSSIA’S HACKING AND INFLUENCE OPS HELP PUTIN

    Fulton Schools Professor Brad Allenby comments about the hacking attack on one of the candidates in the French presidential election, speculating on the identity of the perpetrators of the hacking and their political motives. Allenby co-directs ASU’s Weaponized Narrative Initiative, which focuses on examining the uses of technology in misinformation campaigns calculated to influence public perception. Public Radio International’s “The World” is broadcast on more than 300 stations across North America. Read more about the study of weaponized narrative.

April

2017
  • HOW TO KEEP CLOTHES FROM SMELLING BAD

    HOW TO KEEP CLOTHES FROM SMELLING BAD

    When people exercise, their bodies sweat and their clothes get wet. And that means their clothes, like their bodies, can smell.

    Paul Westerhoff is a professor of Environmental Engineering at Arizona State University. He researched the effectiveness of silver in clothes to kill bacteria and how it impacts the environment. The study was published in Environmental Science & Technology last year.

  • ROBOTS TAUGHT TO WORK ALONGSIDE HUMANS BY GIVING HIGH FIVES

    ROBOTS TAUGHT TO WORK ALONGSIDE HUMANS BY GIVING HIGH FIVES

    Heni Ben Amor, an assistance professor who specializes in advanced robotics and artificial intelligence at ASU, says that having robots learn from watching humans interact won’t just make them better collaborators, it will help humans feel more at ease around robots too. “There’s a high demand for robots that are socially aware,” he says.

    If robots can learn the basics of social interaction, like knowing how fast to move their arms or how close to stand to a person without making them feel uncomfortable, then humans are much more likely to accept robots in their home or workplace, he says.

  • VALLEY METRO CEO: FEDERAL CUTS THREATEN LIGHT RAIL, TROLLEY PROJECTS

    VALLEY METRO CEO: FEDERAL CUTS THREATEN LIGHT RAIL, TROLLEY PROJECTS

    Fulton Schools Professor Ram Pendyala, whose expertise is in transportation systems engineering and planning, comments on the potential benefits of public transportation systems and on the costs-versus-benefits aspect of the debate over government funding of mass transit projects.

  • DARPA TO USE ELECTRICAL STIMULATION TO ENHANCE MILITARY TRAINING

    DARPA TO USE ELECTRICAL STIMULATION TO ENHANCE MILITARY TRAINING

    Fulton Schools Associate Professor Stephen Helms Tillery is leading a research group that has a key role in a Department of Defense agency’s project to expand human learning capability. His team will develop techniques to stimulate specific nerve complexes in the brain with the goal of enhancing its neuroplasticity to improve mental abilities. Read more about the overall project on the Gizmodo technology and science news site.

    Also See:

  • SILICON VALLEY HIRES THE MOST ALUMNI OF THESE 10 UNIVERSITIES, AND NONE OF THEM ARE IN THE IVY LEAGUE

    SILICON VALLEY HIRES THE MOST ALUMNI OF THESE 10 UNIVERSITIES, AND NONE OF THEM ARE IN THE IVY LEAGUE

    The most coveted jobs are in Silicon Valley, and most selective US universities are members of the Ivy League. So it stands to reason that tech giants like Apple, Google, Amazon and Facebook would scoop up best and brightest from those bastions of power and privilege.

    Arizona State University ranks among the top 10 schools with the most undergraduate and graduate alumni hired by the 25 biggest Silicon Valley employers in the last year, ranking ahead of Cornell, Purdue and MIT.

  • MAKING THE RIGHT PICK: HOW ARIZONA COLLEGES ARE STEPPING IN TO TEACH GRADS THE SKILLS COMPANIES NEED IN NEW HIRES

    MAKING THE RIGHT PICK: HOW ARIZONA COLLEGES ARE STEPPING IN TO TEACH GRADS THE SKILLS COMPANIES NEED IN NEW HIRES

    Starbucks’ relationship with Arizona State University, where Starbucks’ employees can earn their bachelor’s degree through ASU’s online program, is an example of bringing students to the curriculum rather than the campus.

    Last year, Ford Motor Co. designated ASU as a premier school and a top-tier Ford recruiting and hiring institution, which means Ford considers ASU a go-to place to recruit graduates.

    “Ford is a perfect example of a greater relationship that we have with a lot of organizations,” said Cindy Parnell, executive director at ASU’s Career and Professional Development Services.

    Another program is the Startup Center in the Ira A. Fulton Schools of Engineering, which offers classes, workshops, mentoring, investment and extracurricular activities that expose students to the concepts of entrepreneurship and technology innovation.

  • ROBOTIC SUIT SPEEDS UP WALKING SPEED

    ROBOTIC SUIT SPEEDS UP WALKING SPEED

    ASU Engineering Professor Tom Sugar has developed a robotic suit meant to help people walk faster and avoid workplace injuries.  The suit propels users forward 10 to 15 percent faster than normal, supporting legs to move faster and more smoothly.

    The exoskeleton was one of the many devices demonstrate during WeRACon 17 in Phoenix last month. 

  • PROFESSOR, COMPANY WORKING ON TECH FOR RETINA TO HELP BLIND

    PROFESSOR, COMPANY WORKING ON TECH FOR RETINA TO HELP BLIND

    According to the World Health Organization, 285 million people worldwide are visually impaired. Thirty-nine million are blind, while 246 million have low vision. 

    Bradley Greger, an associate professor at ASU, is partnering with a California-based company called Second Sight on technology that can be placed on the retina to provide a limited amount of vision to blind people. He’s also working on a brain implant that will provide some vision for the blind. He’s with me to talk about it.

  • RESEARCHERS TREAT AMPUTEES BY STIMULATING NERVES IN FDA TRIAL

    RESEARCHERS TREAT AMPUTEES BY STIMULATING NERVES IN FDA TRIAL

    Fulton Schools Associate Professor James Abbas is collaborating with researchers at Florida International University to make advances in bioelectronics medicine and prosthetics technologies that could restore a sense of touch for amputees.

  • ASU LAB HOME TO LARGEST WASTE REPOSITORY IN U.S.

    ASU LAB HOME TO LARGEST WASTE REPOSITORY IN U.S.

    Many valuable questions about public health can be answered by analyzing samples from sewage sludge, says Fulton Schools Professor Rolf Halden, director of the Center for Environmental Security. His lab stores a large collection of the revealing material.

March

2017
  • ASU STUDENT MAY KNOW HOW TO CREATE LIFE ON THE MOON

    ASU STUDENT MAY KNOW HOW TO CREATE LIFE ON THE MOON

    Fulton Schools computer systems engineering student Autumn Conner has an idea for sending a small capsule containing a kind of bacteria to the moon, where it could create photosynthesis. A startup venture based in India has selected her idea for funding.

  • STRIPPING CARBON DIOXIDE FROM THE ATMOSPHERE

    STRIPPING CARBON DIOXIDE FROM THE ATMOSPHERE

    Researchers in the Center for Negative Carbon Emissions led by Fulton Schools Professor Klaus Lackner are developing technologies that promise to enable removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. In an interview on Australian national radio, Lackner said carbon-capture systems may be the most effective option for keeping the buildup of this greenhouse gas from rising to levels at which it would pose a critical threat to the health of Earth’s environment.  

  • 3D PRINTING PROSTHETICS PART 1: WAYS TO GET INVOLVED

    3D PRINTING PROSTHETICS PART 1: WAYS TO GET INVOLVED

    A group of ASU materials science engineers, Jason Enriquez, Tayler Fulton, Nicholas Lauer and Brian Zucker, dedicated its Capstone project to improving existing 3D printing open source designs. By connecting through their professors with local companies in the additive manufacturing field, the students are identifying better materials and how to 3D print with them for this purpose. The end goal is to improve on current open-source transhumeral (upper arm) prostheses; additional guidance is being offered by Justin Ryan, the lead research scientist at the Cardiac 3D Print Lab, Phoenix Children’s Hospital.

  • ARIZONA STUDENTS’ TEAM TO COMPETE IN SPACEX HYPERLOOP COMPETITION

    ARIZONA STUDENTS’ TEAM TO COMPETE IN SPACEX HYPERLOOP COMPETITION

    Arizona’s Hyperloop team, led by ASU engineering master’s student Lynne Nethken and senior Josh Kosar, say the Space X competition is just a first step to bringing high speed, mass transportation to Arizona and beyond.

    If chosen to continue in the competition, the team will get to launch its prototype pod in the one-mile test track this summer in Hawthorne, California.

    The Hyperloop is a proposed form of high-speed mass transportation that can achieve speeds of up to 750 miles per hour.

  • IT’S TIME FOR US GEEKS TO STAND UP AND BE HEARD

    IT’S TIME FOR US GEEKS TO STAND UP AND BE HEARD

    Computer scientists are often left out of public debate on issues that involve computer science, and that’s a potentially serious mistake when the goal is to improve cybersecurity, says Fulton Schools Professor of Practice Nayda Bliss, director of Arizona State University’s Global Security Initiative. For the sake of making cyberspace safer for all of us, computer geeks must no longer let themselves be ignored, she says.

  • PUBLIC-PRIVATE ’MARRIAGE’ TO DRIVE STEM GROWTH

    PUBLIC-PRIVATE ’MARRIAGE’ TO DRIVE STEM GROWTH

    “University and industry are like darlings, always praising each other, but we need to ‘get married’ already, and be fully committed to helping each other, compensating for each other’s weaknesses,” said Nguyen Thanh Nam, former CEO of FPT and founder of online university FUNIX, at a conference on science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) education and in the workforce.

    The conference, held this year in Hanoi, was organized by the ASU’s Higher Engineering Education Alliance Program (HEEAP).

  • SPECTACULAR ENGINEERING FILM INSPIRES KIDS TO DREAM BIG

    SPECTACULAR ENGINEERING FILM INSPIRES KIDS TO DREAM BIG

    Angelica Hernandez, 2011 ASU Distinguished Grad in Mechanical Engineering, is featured in “Dream Big: Our Engineering World,” a documentary created to promote education in STEM. Hernandez, who went on to earn her master’s at Stanford, was a member of the Phoenix high school team that beat 2004 MIT in 2004.

    The documentary is airing at the Arizona Science Center’s Irene P. Flinn Theater as follows:

    March 3-12

    • 9:30 a.m.
    • 10:30 a.m. (except Saturday, March 11)
    • 12:30 p.m.
    • 2:30 p.m.
    • 4:30pm (except March 3-9)

    March 13-31:

    • 9:30 a.m.
    • 4:30 p.m. 
  • OUR BOTS, OURSELVES

    OUR BOTS, OURSELVES

    The future may be a world in which we live with artificial intelligence “agents” that speak to us in human voices and understand our thoughts and feelings on a deep level. Futurists foresee people partnering with lifelong “digital assistants” or “virtual companions” that guide us through life, and which might eventually take the form of brain implants. Experts such as Fulton Schools Professor Subbarao Kambhampati, president of the Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence, comment on some of the benefits and possible risks of such potential developments.

February

2017
  • ASU GRAD, MIAO HE, HONORED FOR WIND TURBINE RESEARCH

    ASU GRAD, MIAO HE, HONORED FOR WIND TURBINE RESEARCH

    Miao He’s work with enhancing the efficiency of wind turbine farms in the face of disruptive weather has earned him a prestigious grant from the National Science Foundation that recognizes the work of up-and-coming faculty.  

    He, an assistant professor in the Texas Tech University Whitacre College of Engineering, has been selected to receive an award from the Faculty Early Career Development Program.  He received his MS in Physics in 2010 and his Ph.D. in Industrial Engineering in 2013, both from ASU.

  • COMPUTER HACKS OF THE FUTURE, AND HOW TO PREVENT THEM

    COMPUTER HACKS OF THE FUTURE, AND HOW TO PREVENT THEM

    The wave of artificial intelligence technology coming at us carries with it the upside of enhancing our lives with things like self-driving cars, as well as the potential downside of threats posed by malicious hacking of the computerized devices and systems we rely on. The situation is discussed by three AI experts, including Subbarao Kamhampati, a Fulton Schools professor of computer science and engineering and president of the Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence. Each of them participated in a three-day Challenges of Artificial Intelligence Workshop at Arizona State University. Illustration: Shutterstock

  • ASU MAKING STRIDES ON EARLY TEST FOR PANCREATIC CANCER

    ASU MAKING STRIDES ON EARLY TEST FOR PANCREATIC CANCER

    Fulton School of Biological Health Systems Engineering Assistant Professor Tony Hu and rand his team at the Biodesign Institute are working on a new test to catch pancreatic cancer in its earliest stages.

    If caught early enough, pancreatic cancer can be controlled, but the sneaky disease develops aggressively and doesn’t usually show any obvious signs in the early stages.

    Because pancreatic cancer is usually caught in the late stages, an estimated 80 percent die within a year of diagnosis, according to the American Cancer Society.

    But Hu’s team has discovered a new method to identify pancreatic cancer in its early development.

  • THIS SIX-LEGGED ROBOT WALKS MORE EFFICIENTLY THAN AN INSECT

    THIS SIX-LEGGED ROBOT WALKS MORE EFFICIENTLY THAN AN INSECT

    Engineers and scientists have long been mimicking nature to find solutions, but some are now making technological advances by improving on nature. Fulton Schools Assistant Professor Ted Pavlic, whose work combines engineering with knowledge of insect behavior, comments on news of the recent achievement of scientists who made a robot that improves on an insect mobility method.

  • COULD PRESIDENT TRUMP TAKE US BACK TO THE MOON?

    COULD PRESIDENT TRUMP TAKE US BACK TO THE MOON?

    President Trump has said he wants to “unlock the mysteries of space” and “focus on stretching the envelope of space exploration.”

    Dr. Scott Parazynski, a retired astronaut and a professor of practice at both ASU’s Schools of Biological Health and Systems Engineering and Earth and Space Exploration called the crewed mission idea an “audacious challenge.”

    “If you have a crew on board, the complexity of the mission increases substantially,” he told NBC News. “You are committing to making it a perfect round trip. You need to have the life support systems, the launch abort system and the recovery systems built into the vehicle the first time around.”

  • ARIZONA STATE UNIVERSITY INCORPORATES BUSINESS START-UP SKILLS INTO ENGINEERING SCHOOLS

    ARIZONA STATE UNIVERSITY INCORPORATES BUSINESS START-UP SKILLS INTO ENGINEERING SCHOOLS

    Arizona State University has designed its engineering schools to not only teach engineering, but also to develop entrepreneurs. In addition to the traditional classroom education, students are given the space and the skills to invent, design, produce, and market what their minds conceive. 

    “The entrepreneurial mindset has become more prevalent in today’s students than ever before,” says Richard Martorano, director of facilities and space renovations for the Ira A. Fulton Schools of Engineering at ASU. “They see the engineers and inventors who have become household names and want to emulate them.”

  • ELON MUSK SAYS HUMANS MUST BECOME CYBORGS TO STAY RELEVANT. IS HE RIGHT?

    ELON MUSK SAYS HUMANS MUST BECOME CYBORGS TO STAY RELEVANT. IS HE RIGHT?

    ASU’s Panagiotis Artemiadis says “no.”

    Artemiadis has been trying to get more bandwidth using a 128-electrode EEG cap to allow a human to control a swarm of flying robots with their brain. “We can already decode basic concepts like closing a hand or moving an elbow, but we can’t decode more complex behaviors,” he said.

    He has created a system that allows for a single person to control the collaborative movement of multiple drones, for example making the flock move closer together so that it can fit through a narrow pass.

    He is skeptical that the rise of AI will render humans irrelevant.

    “We are building these machines to serve humans,” he said.

  • TEAM OF ARIZONA STATE UNIVERSITY STUDENTS WORK TO IMPROVE ACCESS TO CLEAN DRINKING WATER IN UNDERDEVELOPED COUNTRIES

    TEAM OF ARIZONA STATE UNIVERSITY STUDENTS WORK TO IMPROVE ACCESS TO CLEAN DRINKING WATER IN UNDERDEVELOPED COUNTRIES

    A project supported by students at Arizona State University is working in underdeveloped countries to improve their access to clean drinking water.

    Five ASU students — Pankti Shah, Paul Strong, Varendra Silva, Mark Huerta and Connor Wiegand — have joined the project, 33 Buckets, in the hopes of making a positive impact and addressing water crises around the globe.

  • MY TURN: ARTS EDUCATION PAVED THE WAY FOR GIRLS’ ROBOTICS WIN

    MY TURN: ARTS EDUCATION PAVED THE WAY FOR GIRLS’ ROBOTICS WIN

    It should be no surprise that a team of girls from an arts schools earned top awards at the recent Arizona FIRST LEGO League championship tournament, says the head of the Arizona School for the Arts. The competition managed by Arizona State University’s Ira A. Fulton Schools of Engineering focuses on robotics and research. The school’s CEO says the team’s success goes to show how arts education fosters creativity, critical thinking and problem-solving skills that translate into talent in taking on the challenges of engineering and science.

January

2017
  • ASA ALL-GIRLS ROBOTICS TEAM WINS STATEWIDE COMPETITION

    ASA ALL-GIRLS ROBOTICS TEAM WINS STATEWIDE COMPETITION

    A team of seven Fifth through Eighth grade robotics students was recently named one of two winning teams selected to head to the FIRST LEGO League World Festival in Houston, Texas on April 19.

    The all-girls team of arts students from downtown Phoenix charter school Arizona School for the Arts (ASA) competed against 96 teams in the Arizona State FIRST LEGO League Challenge hosted by the Ira A. Fulton School of Engineering on Jan. 14-15. The competition encourages youth to think like scientists and engineers through problem-solving and teamwork.

  • SEE INSIDE THE SOUTHWEST’S LARGEST 3D PRINTING RESEARCH FACILITY AT ASU

    SEE INSIDE THE SOUTHWEST’S LARGEST 3D PRINTING RESEARCH FACILITY AT ASU

    The Southwest’s largest 3D printing research facility has opened at the Polytechnic School at Arizona State University’s Additive Manufacturing Research Center in Mesa.

    The 15,000-square-foot addition, holding $2.5 million of plastic, polymer and 3D metal printing equipment, will be used for a variety of research and development activities with students.

    Also see:  Arizona State University, businesses team up for Manufacturing Research and Innovation Hub, Arizona Business Daily, Jan. 30

  • CLEANING THE AIR WITH PLASTIC [EXCERPT]

    CLEANING THE AIR WITH PLASTIC [EXCERPT]

    Scientists and engineers are trying inventions such as artificial trees to pull carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere

    An excerpt from David Biello’s book, The Unnatural World: The Race to Remake Civilization in Earth’s Newest Age, features the work of Klaus Lackner and his team at Arizona State University’s Fulton Schools of Engineering. 

    An artificial tree on the Tempe campus — thin strips of beige, wavy plastic stacked one atop another in a clear box hidden from the desert sun by a piece of plywood covered in a black cloth — can suck CO2 out of the air.

  • NEW AUTISM TREATMENT COULD COME FROM ALTERING GUT MICROBIOTA

    NEW AUTISM TREATMENT COULD COME FROM ALTERING GUT MICROBIOTA

    Getting to the guts of the matter for autism is exactly what a group of investigators, led by scientists at Arizona State University (ASU), hopes to accomplish with its novel approach to effective autism treatments by focusing on improving the gut microbiome through fecal microbial transplants. While initial results from a small human study are promising, additional testing will be necessary before an FDA-approved therapy would be available or recommended to the public. The research team was led by ASU’s James Adams, a professor of materials science and engineering. The study results were published in the journal Microbiome.

    Also see:  

  • ASU SPINOUT GETS NATIONAL FUNDING FOR TISSUE CHIP

    ASU SPINOUT GETS NATIONAL FUNDING FOR TISSUE CHIP

    Mechanical engineering grad David Richardson has received funding for ASU spinout company bioSyntagma, developed while he was a research engineer at the Biodesign Institute. The company’s Light Stream FloCell™ allows researchers to understand how disease-causing cells interact with each other and may be able to answer questions relating to why cancers metastasize, which drugs are most effective for a patient at a given point in time, and what disease mechanisms are active in arthritis, diabetes, and dementia.

  • NEW ASU CENTER TO RESEARCH FUTURE OF TRANSPORTATION

    NEW ASU CENTER TO RESEARCH FUTURE OF TRANSPORTATION

    Arizona State University has been named the lead institution for a new U.S. Department of Transportation Tier 1 University Transportation Center and will work with the U.S. Department of Transportation on improving regional and local transportation systems. The Center for Teaching Old Models New Tricks, or TOMNET, will work to improve data models and analytical tools used to plan transportation infrastructure, said SEBE Professor Ram Pendyala, the center’s director.

    “If we can find ways to successfully integrate these kinds of behavioral variables into our analytics, then I think we can make a quantum leap in our ability to predict future travel needs and desires,” Pendyala said

  • SOUTHWEST’S LARGEST ADDITIVE MANUFACTURING HUB FORMED AT ASU IN PARTNERSHIP WITH HONEYWELL AEROSPACE, PADT, CONCEPT LASER

    SOUTHWEST’S LARGEST ADDITIVE MANUFACTURING HUB FORMED AT ASU IN PARTNERSHIP WITH HONEYWELL AEROSPACE, PADT, CONCEPT LASER

    One of the ‘outstanding’ facilities is the Manufacturing Research and Innovation Hub, a 15,000-square-foot center containing a lab with over $2 million worth of polymer and plastic materials and 3D metal printing equipment. The university recently formed a partnership with Honeywell Aerospace, Phoenix Analysis & Design Technologies, Inc. (PADT), and Concept Laser to help build and make the new facility a reality.

    “If you go to school in Arizona and hope to pursue a manufacturing engineering undergraduate degree, the only place you can get one is ASU’s Polytechnic School.”

  • ZYGOTE JOURNAL INTERVIEW: KONRAD RYKACZEWSKI

    ZYGOTE JOURNAL INTERVIEW: KONRAD RYKACZEWSKI

    A recent special issue of the Zygote Journal, which focuses on biologically inspired science and design, features interviews with speakers at the first Biomimicry Summit and Education Forum for Aerospace. Among the them is Konrad Rykaczewski, Fulton Schools assistant professor of aerospace and mechanical engineering.

    In his interview, he talks about how the abilities of a poisonous dart frog led him to an idea for a de-icing method that could make flight safer, and how mimicking the natural mechanisms involved in the way water interacts with prickly pear cactus could provide a basis for some useful technological developments. He also has found a particularly effective way to wash pesky insects off of vegetables.

    Rykaczewski’s interview begins on page 96 of the digital magazine.You can download the issue, or enlarge it on your computer screen. Read more about Rykaczewski’s recent research at: http://intheloop.engineering.asu.edu/2017/01/30/turning-to-nano-engineering-to-fight-off-troublesome-frost-and-ice/

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