Materials science doctoral student wins Outstanding Student MBE Award in China

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Materials science doctoral student wins Outstanding Student MBE Award in China

girl in lab coat looking at items with a flashlight

Calli Campbell, a materials science and engineering doctoral student, operates a Molecular Beam Epitaxy machine used to grow the two compounds of her research focus. Photo courtesy of Calli Campbell

Calli Campbell, a doctoral student studying materials science and engineering, won the Outstanding Student MBE Award for her oral presentation at the 20th International Conference on Molecular Beam Epitaxy in Shanghai, China. Out of 135 student presentations, Campbell earned one of the two Outstanding Student awards.

The conference is an international forum for sharing developments in the areas of molecular beam epitaxy research including techniques, new materials and devices. MBE is a method to deposit ultra-thin crystals used when creating nanotechnology and semiconductors, like solar cells or lasers.

In her presentation, “MBE growth and band-offset measurement of CdTe/InSb(002) heterovalent interface,” she discussed using X-ray photoelectronic spectroscopy to look at the junction between MBE-grown crystalline compounds cadmium telluride and indium antimonide. This measurement technique offers a clearer picture of the relationship between the two materials. Together, the materials are used in items like solar cells, lasers and multi-color photodetectors.

On September 7, Campbell received the award for the quality of her research and presentation. She appreciates the support of her co-authors Xingye Wang and Robert Nemanich and her advisor Yong-Hang Zhang, under whom she is a graduate research assistant in electrical, computer and energy engineering.

“I am incredibly honored since this is a community full of people I learn from and look up to,” said Campbell. “It is nice to know that our work at ASU is being well-received by the global MBE community.”

About The Author

Haley MacDonell

Haley MacDonell studies journalism at ASU's Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communications. She currently works as a science/technology writer for Ira A. Fulton Schools of Engineering.

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